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I figli della mezzanotte (1981)

di Salman Rushdie

Altri autori: Vedi la sezione altri autori.

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiConversazioni / Citazioni
12,756230394 (4.05)1 / 957
In India, one thousand and one children are born in the hour following the midnight commemorating the country's independence from British rule. And of those children, none is more entwined with the destiny of that land thatn Saleem Sinai, he of dubious birth and a nose of astounding proportion. Discovering a psychic connection with midnight's other thousand, Saleem recounts a life both reflecting and recreating the modern history of his oft-troubled homeland.… (altro)
  1. 130
    Cent'anni di solitudine di Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Nickelini)
  2. 71
    Il dio delle piccole cose di Arundhati Roy (GoST)
  3. 61
    Il tamburo di latta di Günter Grass (GabrielF, CGlanovsky)
    GabrielF: I think Rushdie based a lot of his style in Midnight's Children on The Tin Drum. Both books are historical epics told through the perspective of a child with strange powers.
    CGlanovsky: A boy bound to the destiny of his birthplace. Surreal elements.
  4. 41
    I versetti satanici di Salman Rushdie (BGP)
  5. 20
    Train to Pakistan di Khushwant Singh (pamelad)
    pamelad: Also set during Partition.
  6. 10
    Un perfetto equilibrio di Rohinton Mistry (Cecrow)
  7. 10
    Kim di Rudyard Kipling (Gregorio_Roth)
    Gregorio_Roth: The book is a modern interpretation of KIM in a number of ways. I think it will complete your point of view on Imperialism and India.
  8. 21
    Il maestro e Margherita di Mikhail Bulgakov (BGP)
  9. 11
    L'ultimo sospiro del Moro di Salman Rushdie (wrmjr66)
    wrmjr66: I think The Moor's Last Sigh is Rushdie's best book since Midnight's Children.
  10. 01
    Island of a Thousand Mirrors di Nayomi Munaweera (evilmoose)
  11. 03
    La casa degli spiriti di Isabel Allende (amyblue)
1980s (4)
Asia (16)
hopes (11)
1960s (231)
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Inglese (217)  Francese (3)  Olandese (2)  Spagnolo (2)  Ceco (1)  Danese (1)  Ebraico (1)  Svedese (1)  Finlandese (1)  Polacco (1)  Tutte le lingue (230)
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  archivomorero | Jun 25, 2022 |
Well! That was, um, long. I know it has won the Booker Prize and the Booker of Bookers, but it is not going down as a favourite of mine.
I's inventive enough, Saleem is born at the stroke of Midnight on the day India gained independence. Through the book, his story is entwined with that of the country itself. A little bit like Forest Gump, he manages to get involved (almost accidentally) with the various events of the country.
He also, along with the 1000 other children born in the first hour of independence, has various magical powers. Like I say, inventive, but it left me cold. Saleem is a most unreliable narrator, he freely admits that certain events of memory cannot have happened in that order, and yet he still recounts his story form memory.
It's inventive, there's a fair turn of phrase, it feels like he does get under India's skin and there a rather odd lack of commas in lists, but I can't say I feel anything more that relief at getting to the end of it. Just not for me. ( )
  Helenliz | Jun 16, 2022 |
It was fine. I don't love Rushdie's writing style but I didn't hate it. I don't know. It was fine. I can see this being the kind of thing I re-read in 10 years and LOVE. ( )
  Midnight_Reader | Feb 3, 2022 |
Ah, Booker of the Bookers. Twice!

Bottom line: If you want to write a really good novel, you should read Midnight's Children and takes some notes from Rushdie. This book is masterfully written and perfectly executed in every sense of the word.

This was probably one of the most difficult novels I've ever read, if not the most difficult. We owe the difficulty to Saleem Sinai's frustrating narration. Saleem narrates the story in a "jumpy" stream-of-consciousness style without much regard to grammar and punctuation. I think Rushdie perfects this style with experimental, risk-taking, care-free sentences that just flow smoothly. It's not that you won't make sense of things, because you definitely will; it's just that it might take you 50 or so pages to get used to it.

In addition, Saleem is a narcissistic character who constructs his own version of reality/events through his narration. He explicitly lies, forgets, leaves things out, includes things that didn't really happen, jumps around in time, etc., making this quite an interesting yet arduous ride.

What I liked most about Midnight's Children is Rushdie's mastery over his own work. Here's a guy who was dedicated enough to perfect and chisel his novel to the very last detail, and I cannot say enough about this. His work shines on multiple levels. It feels so coherent and connected. Almost nothing is wasted (despite the book's length). And everything came together beautifully in the end. The dots just connect with Rushdie. It's exactly everything you would expect from a great novel. Masterful.

It's an engrossing, extremely rich, and dense work. But somehow, I do feel this novel is missing a certain "timelessness" quality. Sure, it has withstood the test of time this long, but it also seems confined to what India/Pakistan/Bangladesh was and is now. I also think the book doesn't lend itself well to a new interpretation upon re-reading, which is why I feel hesitant to give this novel a 5-star rating. ( )
  nonames | Jan 14, 2022 |
This winner of the "Booker of Bookers" is a difficult book to read, and a far more difficult one to rate. It frustrated me to no end with the meandering narrative that required me to re-re-read several paragraphs quite frequently and an unusual literary style that challenged my comprehension. The only motivation for me to persevere with it was the magic Mr. Rushdie has made with the words; almost every sentence from this book is eminently quotable!
It certainly demands another reading, which I hope to give it, in the not-far-away future. ( )
  aravind_aar | Nov 21, 2021 |
Midnight's Children is a teeming fable of postcolonial India, told in magical-realist fashion by a telepathic hero born at the stroke of midnight on the day the country became independent. First published in 1981, it was met with little immediate excitement.
aggiunto da mikeg2 | modificaThe Guardian, Lindesay Irvine (Jul 10, 2008)
 
"The literary map of India is about to be redrawn. . . . What [English-language fiction about India] has been missing is . . . something just a little coarse, a hunger to swallow India whole and spit it out. . . . Now, in 'Midnight's Children,' Salman Rushdie has realized that ambition."
aggiunto da GYKM | modificaNew York Times, Clarke Blaise (Apr 19, 1981)
 

» Aggiungi altri autori (35 potenziali)

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Rushdie, Salmanautore primariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Capriolo, EttoreTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Davidson, AndrewImmagine di copertinaautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Häilä, ArtoTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Howard, IanImmagine di copertinaautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Schuchart, MaxTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Versluys, MarijkeA cura diautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
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Titolo canonico
Titolo originale
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Data della prima edizione
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Film correlati
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Premi e riconoscimenti
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Epigrafe
Dedica
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For Zafar Rushdie
who, contrary to all expectations,
was born in the afternoon.
Incipit
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I was born in the city of Bombay . . . once upon a time.
Citazioni
Ultime parole
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(Click per vedere. Attenzione: può contenere anticipazioni.)
Nota di disambiguazione
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Please distinguish among:

-- Salman Rushdie's original 1981 novel, Midnight's Children;

-- Rushdie's 1999 screenplay adaptation (with introduction) of the novel, having the same title; and

-- The 2003 stage play, Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children, adapted for theater by Rushdie, Tim Supple and Simon Reade.

Thank you.
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DDC/MDS Canonico
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In India, one thousand and one children are born in the hour following the midnight commemorating the country's independence from British rule. And of those children, none is more entwined with the destiny of that land thatn Saleem Sinai, he of dubious birth and a nose of astounding proportion. Discovering a psychic connection with midnight's other thousand, Saleem recounts a life both reflecting and recreating the modern history of his oft-troubled homeland.

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Media: (4.05)
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