Pagina principaleGruppiConversazioniAltroStatistiche
Cerca nel Sito
Questo sito utilizza i cookies per fornire i nostri servizi, per migliorare le prestazioni, per analisi, e (per gli utenti che accedono senza fare login) per la pubblicità. Usando LibraryThing confermi di aver letto e capito le nostre condizioni di servizio e la politica sulla privacy. Il tuo uso del sito e dei servizi è soggetto a tali politiche e condizioni.
Hide this

Risultati da Google Ricerca Libri

Fai clic su di un'immagine per andare a Google Ricerca Libri.

Sto caricando le informazioni...

La prossima volta il fuoco: due lettere

di James Baldwin

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
3,4681022,773 (4.29)235
At once a powerful evocation of his early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice to both the individual and the body politic, James Baldwin galvanized the nation in the early days of the civil rights movement with his eloquent manifesto.
Sto caricando le informazioni...

Iscriviti per consentire a LibraryThing di scoprire se ti piacerà questo libro.

Attualmente non vi sono conversazioni su questo libro.

» Vedi le 235 citazioni

Baldwin is thoughtful and angry. For good reason. How depressing to think that almost 60 years after this book was written and the country has still not changed its basic attitude toward the African American, whose forefathers were brought to this country in chains and used like work animals, but treated much, much worse. ( )
  wagnerkim | Jul 21, 2021 |
Short book discussing race issues from the mid-60's. One statement Baldwin made was how a Black man would never be able to hold a position of leadership or authority in white America. And today, some forty years later, we have a Black President. Apparently, the Nation has come a long way since then, so the book is an interesting look back for those too young to remember the racial tension of the 60's. ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
A short letter to his nephew and a long diatribe about race relations, with many relevant points even 54 years after the book's initial publication in 1963. Baldwin makes some very powerful points about the need for all people to take action against injustice and not go along with the prevailing sentiment or popular opinions. He places the blame for pervasive racism less on the perpetrators than on the enablers. Another interesting point he made was how the poor treatment of blacks fighting to support America's freedom in WWII was an affront: risking their lives, they still faced racism in the war and upon their return. Using the church to escape the streets seemed contrived, especially since he did not really have a passion for his own, and I wish he had developed a more definitive position of the Black Muslim movement and the Hon. Elijah Mohammed. I think the longer portion of the book could have been better organized, perhaps into topical chapters, as it seemed to wander. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Not content to just be slapped around by Ta-Nehisi Coates, I had to follow up reading Between the World and Me with the one-two punch of this earlier dissection of race in America that a little research told me was an inspiration for Coates's book. Unforgivably, I had never read James Baldwin, but Mr. Baldwin himself would find that unsurprising, I'm sure. I can't really begin to summarize or review either book, but reading their combined 258 pages was an eye-opening, gut-wrenching experience. They have left me with plenty to think about, and, ideally, do, to forestall the certain doom that Coates certainly sees the United States marching towards and that Baldwin seems to hold out a bit of hope can be averted. Given that some things have improved, but many others have remained egregiously the same or grown worse in the 50-odd years since The Fire Next Time's publication, it's very hard to say whether flames are imminent. Whatever happens, I'm glad to have read both men's eloquent, incisive, and persuasive diagnoses of this country's ills. ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
A short work in two parts - one a letter to his nephew and one a reflection on religion, race, freedom, and the United States. Written in 1963, these are issues still being discussed and things still not reckoned with in America. Powerful, intellectual, and left me wanting to discuss.
Got this as part of the Great Book Race project. ( )
  ewyatt | Jul 6, 2021 |
nessuna recensione | aggiungi una recensione
Devi effettuare l'accesso per contribuire alle Informazioni generali.
Per maggiori spiegazioni, vedi la pagina di aiuto delle informazioni generali.
Titolo canonico
Titolo originale
Titoli alternativi
Data della prima edizione
Personaggi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Luoghi significativi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Eventi significativi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Film correlati
Premi e riconoscimenti
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Epigrafe
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
"God gave Noah the rainbow sign,
No more water, the fire next time!"
Dedica
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
for James
James
Luc James
Incipit
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Dear James:
I have begun this letter five times and torn it up five times.
Citazioni
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Whoever debases others is debasing himself.
Ultime parole
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
(Click per vedere. Attenzione: può contenere anticipazioni.)
Nota di disambiguazione
Redattore editoriale
Elogi
Lingua originale
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
DDC/MDS Canonico

Risorse esterne che parlano di questo libro

Wikipedia in inglese (1)

At once a powerful evocation of his early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice to both the individual and the body politic, James Baldwin galvanized the nation in the early days of the civil rights movement with his eloquent manifesto.

Non sono state trovate descrizioni di biblioteche

Descrizione del libro
Riassunto haiku

Link rapidi

Copertine popolari

Voto

Media: (4.29)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5 1
2 9
2.5 6
3 76
3.5 18
4 209
4.5 32
5 300

Sei tu?

Diventa un autore di LibraryThing.

 

A proposito di | Contatto | LibraryThing.com | Privacy/Condizioni d'uso | Guida/FAQ | Blog | Negozio | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteche di personaggi celebri | Recensori in anteprima | Informazioni generali | 160,463,203 libri! | Barra superiore: Sempre visibile