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2 opere 781 membri 16 recensioni

Opere di Jacqueline L. Tobin

Etichette

Informazioni generali

Data di nascita
1950-01-28
Sesso
female
Nazionalità
USA

Utenti

Recensioni

This book had such promise and started out so well and then fell so flat.

The premise of the book is the story of Ozella and her ancestors, as told to the author in Ozella's quilt booth at a vendor's market. It's the story we want to hear when we pick up the book and the author tells us she has now heard the story. Just when we think we are going to hear the story as Ozella told it, which would have been what gave this book strength and potency, we veer off instead into what the authors made of the different little pieces of the story instead of hearing the actual story as it was told.

This weakened the book and left me as the reader feeling as if the story was still being kept hidden. There was a lot of conjecture and research presented instead and whilst it was interesting at times and I did learn some things that were fascinating, I still found myself feeling like what I really wanted was to hear Ozella's story retold from that moment when Jacqueline was sitting at her feet surrounded by quilts for three hours. If the authors had done that and *then* presented their research, this book would have been much more satisfying and impactful to read. Instead, it felt like the story was kept secret with just little pieces of it exposed here and there.

It had potential but didn't deliver.
… (altro)
 
Segnalato
erindarlyn | 12 altre recensioni | Jan 21, 2023 |
This is a book with interesting information, an extensive bibliography, and some pictures. However, it is repetitive and not seamlessly written. I imagine Tobin wrote it thinking it would be used for research, but since it is not indexed.... It is a shame that Tobin did not pay for an editor to tighten it up. As an example, it frequently suggests to the reader to "see the color photo section." The Kindle version does have some color photographs, but there is NO "color photo section."
 
Segnalato
kaulsu | 12 altre recensioni | Oct 18, 2022 |
This book is a breath of fresh air in terms of presenting oral histories as valid, and folk history as usable in an academic setting. Forms of record-keeping which are not written using methods recognized by dominant cultures, whether academia, today, or the former empires of England, Spain, etc, are almost always discounted, or destroyed, as the Quipus of the Incan empire.

These quilts are essentially, it sounds, like an updated form of Quipu (Khipu) made from fabric rather than strands of yarn or twine cordage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quipu

Page 29 made me think of the strain sometimes found between differing cultural interpretations and valuations of oral history and what makes a fact a fact, or something 'obvious,' well, obvious. In other words, the academic methodology versus intuitive oral tradition. As a phd student, I was horrified at the first presentation I attended by a fellow doctoral student. She presented her preliminary findings based on two years of research, and I found myself thinking that if any of my family could see this, they would all tell me I was wasting my time and money in doing research, if I would end up presenting findings as blindingly obviousl as hers. But, as on Page 31, the fear of ridicule forces one to follow a methodology that can be at odds with what one's gut instincts say are obvious. And when those two ways of thinking clash, it is the dominant culture that wins.

Thanks to these many authors for making non-dominant cultural histories valid again.
Shira Destinie
Willaim-James-MEOW Date: 27 August, 12014 H.E.
… (altro)
 
Segnalato
FourFreedoms | 12 altre recensioni | May 17, 2019 |
This book is a breath of fresh air in terms of presenting oral histories as valid, and folk history as usable in an academic setting. Forms of record-keeping which are not written using methods recognized by dominant cultures, whether academia, today, or the former empires of England, Spain, etc, are almost always discounted, or destroyed, as the Quipus of the Incan empire.

These quilts are essentially, it sounds, like an updated form of Quipu (Khipu) made from fabric rather than strands of yarn or twine cordage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quipu

Page 29 made me think of the strain sometimes found between differing cultural interpretations and valuations of oral history and what makes a fact a fact, or something 'obvious,' well, obvious. In other words, the academic methodology versus intuitive oral tradition. As a phd student, I was horrified at the first presentation I attended by a fellow doctoral student. She presented her preliminary findings based on two years of research, and I found myself thinking that if any of my family could see this, they would all tell me I was wasting my time and money in doing research, if I would end up presenting findings as blindingly obviousl as hers. But, as on Page 31, the fear of ridicule forces one to follow a methodology that can be at odds with what one's gut instincts say are obvious. And when those two ways of thinking clash, it is the dominant culture that wins.

Thanks to these many authors for making non-dominant cultural histories valid again.
Shira Destinie
Willaim-James-MEOW Date: 27 August, 12014 H.E.
… (altro)
 
Segnalato
ShiraDest | 12 altre recensioni | Mar 6, 2019 |

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Statistiche

Opere
2
Utenti
781
Popolarità
#32,597
Voto
3.1
Recensioni
16
ISBN
12

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