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The New Testament and the People of God di…
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The New Testament and the People of God (originale 1992; edizione 1996)

di N.T. Wright

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiConversazioni / Citazioni
1,616119,052 (4.49)1 / 28
Volume 1: This first volume in the series Christian Origins and the Question of God provides a historical, theological, and literary study of first-century Judaism and Christianity. Wright offers a preliminary discussion of the meaning of the word god within those cultures, as he explores the ways in which developing an understanding of those first-century cultures are of relevance for the modern world. Volume 2: In this highly anticipated volume, N.T. Wright focuses directly on the historical Jesus: Who was he? What did he say? And what did he mean by it? Wright begins by showing how the questions posed by Albert Schweitzer a century ago remain central today. Then he sketches a profile of Jesus in terms of his prophetic praxis, his subversive stories, the symbols by which he reordered his world, and the answers he gave to the key questions that any world view must address. The examination of Jesus' aims and beliefs, argued on the basis of Jesus' actions and their accompanying riddles, is sure to stimulate heated response. Wright offers a provocative portrait of Jesus as Israel's Messiah who would share and bear the fate of the nation and would embody the long-promised return of Israel's God to Zion. Volume 3: Why did Christianity begin, and why did it take the shape it did? To answer this question, which any historian must face, renowned New Testament scholar N.T. Wright focuses on the key question: what precisely happened at Easter? What did the early Christians mean when they said that Jesus of Nazareth had been raised from the dead? What can be said today about this belief? This book ... sketches a map of ancient beliefs about life after death, in both the Greco-Roman and Jewish worlds. It then highlights the fact that the early Christians' belief about the afterlife belonged firmly on the Jewish spectrum, while introducing several new mutations and sharper definitions. This, together with other features of early Christianity, forces the historian to read the Easter narratives in the gospels, not simply as late rationalizations of early Christian spirituality, but as accounts of two actual events: the empty tomb of Jesus and his 'appearances.' How do we explain these phenomena? The early Christians' answer was that Jesus had indeed been bodily raised from the dead; that was why they hailed him as the messianic 'son of God.' No modern historian has come up with a more convincing explanation. Facing this question, we are confronted to this day with the most central issues of worldview and theology. Volume 4: This highly anticipated two-book ... volume in N.T. Wright's magisterial series ... is destined to become the standard reference point on the subject for all serious students of the Bible and theology. The mature summation of a lifetime's study, this landmark book pays a rich tribute to the breadth and depth of the apostle's vision, and offers an unparalleled wealth of detailed insights into his life, times, and enduring impact. Wright carefully explores the whole context of Paul's thought and activity Jewish, Greek and Roman, cultural, philosophical, religious, and imperial and shows how the apostle's worldview and theology enabled him to engage with the many-sided complexities of first-century life that his churches were facing. Wright also provides close and illuminating readings of the letters and other primary sources, along with critical insights into the major twists and turns of exegetical and theological debate in the vast secondary literature. The result is a rounded and profoundly compelling account of the man who became the world's first, and greatest, Christian theologian."--Publisher descriptions.… (altro)
Utente:stevewedge
Titolo:The New Testament and the People of God
Autori:N.T. Wright
Info:SPCK Publishing (1996), Hardcover
Collezioni:La tua biblioteca
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The New Testament and the People of God di N. T. Wright (1992)

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A very clearly written, well-argued, but sometimes repetitive book. The first methodological section is embarrassing for anyone who has read literary criticism or philosophy of the last forty years--as ever, the other humanistic disciplines take a while to catch up (viz, classics). But Wright's approach is fair. You might even call it common-sensical, except that it's couched in such high-flown concepts: to understand what people meant by their texts, you should try to find out how they saw the world. Very good. Not sure why we need Greimas for that.

His criticisms of other theologians or hermeneuts are good (basically, they all have an agenda, and so does Wright, but his is usually less obtrusive than theirs). His questions are good (e.g., what exactly did these people mean by 'God', anyway?). His answers are interesting ("works" are signs of Jewish identity, not good deeds; the 'kingdom of God' was always an allegorical claim about the end of the present world order, never a factual claim about the end of the world itself; Christians believed, from the start, that Jesus was the Messiah).

I just hope the volumes on Jesus and Paul are less repetitive. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
Wright has been justifiably criticised for his understanding of justification by faith, particularly in Paul. But Wright is a far better historian than he is a theologian, and his insistence (against a great deal of non-evangelical biblical study) that the New Testament is to be taken seriously from a historical perspective is much-needed in the academy. Rather like Karl Barth, Wright unnecessarily challenges vital evangelical doctrines, whilst at the same time driving a nail into the coffin of overly critical or liberal scholarship. And unlike Barth, Wright does so with a vibrant writing-style that belies the academic nature of his arguments. I can’t recommend Wright unequivocally, but for those who understand his weaknesses and read him critically, this is a wonderfully stimulating read. ( )
  mark_read | Aug 13, 2020 |
X
  StFrancisofAssisi | Apr 30, 2019 |
The beginning of Wright's Christian Origins and the Question of God series, laying the foundation of all that will come to pass.

In this first volume Wright attempts to clear the air and set forth both the fundamental basis upon which further investigation can proceed and to provide a coherent historical background for the study of Jesus and early Christianity. He explores in great detail the types of criticism to which the New Testament is subjected, the philosophies of history to which the NT has been subjected, and makes the case for critical historical realism. He points out the strengths of various approaches as well as their limitations. He attempts to make sense of Jesus and early Christianity in terms of Second Temple Judaism, and does well at exploring the life, beliefs, and praxis of Jewish people in the first century.

In so many ways Wright's work is important to obtain a strong grounding in the historical realities surrounding the New Testament. An extremely impressive work. ( )
1 vota deusvitae | Dec 2, 2016 |
A review and critique of previous critical work on the New Testament, with special emphasis upon the NT in it's first century Judaic context. He focuses upon the "worldviews" of Judaism and Christianity, with a refreshing interaction with hard data. Christianity's "story" is an answer/fulfillment/subversion of the "story" of Judaism.

Finally! A critical approach to the NT with something constructive to say!
  KirkLowery | Mar 4, 2014 |
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For Brian Walsh
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For some years I tried to write two books side by side: one about Paul and his theology, the other about Jesus within his historical context.
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If we read the New Testament as it stands, it claims on every page to be speaking of things which are true in the public domain. It is not simply, like so many books, a guide for private spiritual advancement.
The christological question, as to whether the statement 'Jesus is God' is true, and if so in what sense, is often asked as if God were the known and Jesus were the unknown; This, I suggest, is manifestly mistaken. If anything, the matter stands the other way around.
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Volume 1: This first volume in the series Christian Origins and the Question of God provides a historical, theological, and literary study of first-century Judaism and Christianity. Wright offers a preliminary discussion of the meaning of the word god within those cultures, as he explores the ways in which developing an understanding of those first-century cultures are of relevance for the modern world. Volume 2: In this highly anticipated volume, N.T. Wright focuses directly on the historical Jesus: Who was he? What did he say? And what did he mean by it? Wright begins by showing how the questions posed by Albert Schweitzer a century ago remain central today. Then he sketches a profile of Jesus in terms of his prophetic praxis, his subversive stories, the symbols by which he reordered his world, and the answers he gave to the key questions that any world view must address. The examination of Jesus' aims and beliefs, argued on the basis of Jesus' actions and their accompanying riddles, is sure to stimulate heated response. Wright offers a provocative portrait of Jesus as Israel's Messiah who would share and bear the fate of the nation and would embody the long-promised return of Israel's God to Zion. Volume 3: Why did Christianity begin, and why did it take the shape it did? To answer this question, which any historian must face, renowned New Testament scholar N.T. Wright focuses on the key question: what precisely happened at Easter? What did the early Christians mean when they said that Jesus of Nazareth had been raised from the dead? What can be said today about this belief? This book ... sketches a map of ancient beliefs about life after death, in both the Greco-Roman and Jewish worlds. It then highlights the fact that the early Christians' belief about the afterlife belonged firmly on the Jewish spectrum, while introducing several new mutations and sharper definitions. This, together with other features of early Christianity, forces the historian to read the Easter narratives in the gospels, not simply as late rationalizations of early Christian spirituality, but as accounts of two actual events: the empty tomb of Jesus and his 'appearances.' How do we explain these phenomena? The early Christians' answer was that Jesus had indeed been bodily raised from the dead; that was why they hailed him as the messianic 'son of God.' No modern historian has come up with a more convincing explanation. Facing this question, we are confronted to this day with the most central issues of worldview and theology. Volume 4: This highly anticipated two-book ... volume in N.T. Wright's magisterial series ... is destined to become the standard reference point on the subject for all serious students of the Bible and theology. The mature summation of a lifetime's study, this landmark book pays a rich tribute to the breadth and depth of the apostle's vision, and offers an unparalleled wealth of detailed insights into his life, times, and enduring impact. Wright carefully explores the whole context of Paul's thought and activity Jewish, Greek and Roman, cultural, philosophical, religious, and imperial and shows how the apostle's worldview and theology enabled him to engage with the many-sided complexities of first-century life that his churches were facing. Wright also provides close and illuminating readings of the letters and other primary sources, along with critical insights into the major twists and turns of exegetical and theological debate in the vast secondary literature. The result is a rounded and profoundly compelling account of the man who became the world's first, and greatest, Christian theologian."--Publisher descriptions.

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