Pagina principaleGruppiConversazioniAltroStatistiche
Questo sito utilizza i cookies per fornire i nostri servizi, per migliorare le prestazioni, per analisi, e (per gli utenti che accedono senza fare login) per la pubblicità. Usando LibraryThing confermi di aver letto e capito le nostre condizioni di servizio e la politica sulla privacy. Il tuo uso del sito e dei servizi è soggetto a tali politiche e condizioni.
Hide this

Risultati da Google Ricerca Libri

Fai clic su di un'immagine per andare a Google Ricerca Libri.

Sto caricando le informazioni...

La colpa dei papi: le strutture dell'inganno

di Garry Wills

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
501935,871 (3.51)14
"The truth, we are told, will make us free.   It is time to free Catholics, lay as well as clerical, from the structures of deceit that are our subtle modern form of papal sin.  Paler, subtler, less dramatic than the sins castigated by Orcagna or Dante, these are the quiet sins of intellectual betrayal." --from the Introduction From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills comes an assured, acutely insightful--and occasionally stinging--critique of the Catholic Church and its hierarchy from the nineteenth century to the present. Papal Sinin the past was blatant, as Catholics themselves realized when they painted popes roasting in hell on their own church walls.  Surely, the great abuses of the past--the nepotism, murders, and wars of conquest--no longer prevail; yet, the sin of the modern papacy, as revealed by Garry Wills in his penetrating new book, is every bit as real, though less obvious than the old sins. Wills describes a papacy that seems steadfastly unwilling to face the truth about itself, its past, and its relations with others.  The refusal of the authorities of the Church to be honest about its teachings has needlessly exacerbated original mistakes.  Even when the Vatican has tried to tell the truth--e.g., about Catholics and the Holocaust--it has ended up resorting to historical distortions and evasions.  The same is true when the papacy has attempted to deal with its record of discrimination against women, or with its unbelievable assertion that "natural law" dictates its sexual code. Though the blithe disregard of some Catholics for papal directives has occasionally been attributed to mere hedonism or willfulness, it actually reflects a failure, after long trying on their part, to find a credible level of honesty in the official positions adopted by modern popes.  On many issues outside the realm of revealed doctrine, the papacy has made itself unbelievable even to the well-disposed laity. The resulting distrust is in fact a neglected reason for the shortage of priests.  Entirely aside from the public uproar over celibacy, potential clergy have proven unwilling to put themselves in a position that supports dishonest teachings. Wills traces the rise of the papacy's stubborn resistance to the truth, beginning with the challenges posed in the nineteenth century by science, democracy, scriptural scholarship, and rigorous history.  The legacy of that resistance, despite the brief flare of John XXIII's papacy and some good initiatives in the 1960s by the Second Vatican Council (later baffled), is still strong in the Vatican. Finally Wills reminds the reader of the positive potential of the Church by turning to some great truth tellers of the Catholic tradition--St. Augustine, John Henry Newman, John Acton, and John XXIII.  In them, Wills shows that the righteous path can still be taken, if only the Vatican will muster the courage to speak even embarrassing truths in the name of Truth itself.… (altro)
Nessuno
Sto caricando le informazioni...

Iscriviti per consentire a LibraryThing di scoprire se ti piacerà questo libro.

Attualmente non vi sono conversazioni su questo libro.

» Vedi le 14 citazioni

Garry Wills presents his case for the existence of an informal structure within the Roman Catholic Church that compels its leaders to deceit in the interest of maintaining unchangeable doctrine. Wills complains from the inside, and many of his arguments have some merit. There are some factual errors that indicate laziness in research or sloppiness in editing, and the case is highly overstated. Wills also seems to overlook the concept of doctrinal development, but the work is thought-provoking and his summary of Augustine's understanding of honesty is powerful. ( )
  MadBeet | Oct 20, 2018 |
PAPAL SIN should be required reading for all Catholic adults and highly recommended for everyone else.

An unintended result is that whatever religion you do or do not have,
you will become more aware of ALL lies and deceit, thanks to Saint Augustine,
and are likely to become a more moral person.

This book is meticulously researched and documented, chapter by chapter,
demonstrating the most recent (beginning around Pius IX) Vatican and Catholic deceits.

Its scope is worldwide and by now, 17 years after publication,
Garry Wills would be having an enhanced field day with the connections between
rampant world population, world climate change, and the Vatican's ongoing idiocy on contraception,
with professed celibates controlling the intimate lives of married and unmarried Catholics.

As well, all of his predictions
regarding an emerging Gay Priesthood have come true, with sad results and jaw-dropping deceits.

His coverage of the cult of the Virgin Mary confirms the bewilderment many of us feel at the endless
mention of SEX in a spiritual setting - why is her hymen glorified or how can you not think about sex
every time it is mentioned?

The Catholic Church, while offering much needed help and solace for the sick and dying,
is a troubling place.

As well, the author confirms that "popes" are never mentioned in the Bible and,
unlike the priests who are modeled after them,
all of the apostles were married.

The alleged divinity and infallibility of the popes receives the condemnation they each deserve.

Unforgettable. ( )
  m.belljackson | Sep 26, 2017 |
Papal Sin is about far more than a few instances of bad behavior from a few popes. Anyone who’s done much reading on the Catholic church should be aware of quite a few instances of popes murdering, lying, thieving, etc. But are those actions in the past? Wills’ argument is that the very structure of the office of the pope requires it to lie and cover up, even if it’s not directly involved in wrong-doing in the last century or so.

As Wills lays them out, the book covers historical dishonesties, doctrinal dishonesties, one on the nature of honesty, and a theology of honesty. As a non-Christian and a layman, I found a different categorization of his themes more helpful. He begins with covering harm against others, then moves on to the lying to cover those up, followed by what Wills considers to be making shit up doctrinally. He then attributes this to an inability to admit when the church has been wrong, which is ultimately a concern with establishing a precedent that breaks the authority of the church hierarchy. The last chapters deal with some of the history and theology of lying withing the Catholic church.

The book’s premise is that the lying is because the church can’t admit to having been wrong without calling bringing to the fore that it’s been wrong before. In other words, it would open a can of worms that could bring about the end of priestly control of the church. The reasoning that this is the cause of much of the church’s flaws jibes with the evidence that Wills produces, but it’s by no means definitive proof.

Full review: http://reading.kingrat.biz/reviews/papal-sin-garry-wills ( )
1 vota KingRat | Oct 7, 2010 |
I was fascinated by this book and the bureaucracy surrounding the decision making process in the Roman Catholic church. Reading this book really sheds light on the recent revelations in the church and the reaction that has followed. ( )
1 vota gmmoney | Sep 8, 2010 |
Disclaimer: I am neither a practicing Catholic nor was I raised as a Catholic.

I noticed this book on the bargain table at a local book store, read the jacket and the table of contents and I was intrigued. The book is divided into four sections: Historical Dishonesties; Doctrinal Dishonesties; The Honesty Issue; and The Splendor Of Truth. I recommend using the "search inside this book" option to review the table of contents and the first chapter.

I found this book a challenge. I read a chapter or two and then did not pick up the book for weeks. At times reading Papal Sin was laborious, yet like physical exercise the mental exercise was beneficial. Of particular interest were the chapters on women (Excluded Women), celibacy of priests (The Pope's Eunuch's and Priestly Caste), priests as sex offenders (Conspiracy of Silence), homosexuality (A Gay Priesthood) and contraception (The Gift of Life).

To a non-Catholic, Papal Sin is educational and fascinating. To a devote Catholic who believes in the infallibility of the Pope, this book is likely blasphemous. ( )
1 vota Grandeplease | Oct 23, 2008 |
Wills, an eminent historian and one of the most intellectually distinguished members of the Catholic laity in the United States, has written a devastating, no-holds-barred, indictment.
 
Devi effettuare l'accesso per contribuire alle Informazioni generali.
Per maggiori spiegazioni, vedi la pagina di aiuto delle informazioni generali.
Titolo canonico
Titolo originale
Titoli alternativi
Data della prima edizione
Personaggi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Luoghi significativi
Eventi significativi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Film correlati
Premi e riconoscimenti
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Epigrafe
Dedica
Incipit
Citazioni
Ultime parole
Nota di disambiguazione
Redattore editoriale
Elogi
Lingua originale
DDC/MDS Canonico

Risorse esterne che parlano di questo libro

Wikipedia in inglese (4)

"The truth, we are told, will make us free.   It is time to free Catholics, lay as well as clerical, from the structures of deceit that are our subtle modern form of papal sin.  Paler, subtler, less dramatic than the sins castigated by Orcagna or Dante, these are the quiet sins of intellectual betrayal." --from the Introduction From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills comes an assured, acutely insightful--and occasionally stinging--critique of the Catholic Church and its hierarchy from the nineteenth century to the present. Papal Sinin the past was blatant, as Catholics themselves realized when they painted popes roasting in hell on their own church walls.  Surely, the great abuses of the past--the nepotism, murders, and wars of conquest--no longer prevail; yet, the sin of the modern papacy, as revealed by Garry Wills in his penetrating new book, is every bit as real, though less obvious than the old sins. Wills describes a papacy that seems steadfastly unwilling to face the truth about itself, its past, and its relations with others.  The refusal of the authorities of the Church to be honest about its teachings has needlessly exacerbated original mistakes.  Even when the Vatican has tried to tell the truth--e.g., about Catholics and the Holocaust--it has ended up resorting to historical distortions and evasions.  The same is true when the papacy has attempted to deal with its record of discrimination against women, or with its unbelievable assertion that "natural law" dictates its sexual code. Though the blithe disregard of some Catholics for papal directives has occasionally been attributed to mere hedonism or willfulness, it actually reflects a failure, after long trying on their part, to find a credible level of honesty in the official positions adopted by modern popes.  On many issues outside the realm of revealed doctrine, the papacy has made itself unbelievable even to the well-disposed laity. The resulting distrust is in fact a neglected reason for the shortage of priests.  Entirely aside from the public uproar over celibacy, potential clergy have proven unwilling to put themselves in a position that supports dishonest teachings. Wills traces the rise of the papacy's stubborn resistance to the truth, beginning with the challenges posed in the nineteenth century by science, democracy, scriptural scholarship, and rigorous history.  The legacy of that resistance, despite the brief flare of John XXIII's papacy and some good initiatives in the 1960s by the Second Vatican Council (later baffled), is still strong in the Vatican. Finally Wills reminds the reader of the positive potential of the Church by turning to some great truth tellers of the Catholic tradition--St. Augustine, John Henry Newman, John Acton, and John XXIII.  In them, Wills shows that the righteous path can still be taken, if only the Vatican will muster the courage to speak even embarrassing truths in the name of Truth itself.

Non sono state trovate descrizioni di biblioteche

Descrizione del libro
Riassunto haiku

Link rapidi

Copertine popolari

Voto

Media: (3.51)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 2
3 19
3.5 2
4 15
4.5 4
5 8

Sei tu?

Diventa un autore di LibraryThing.

 

A proposito di | Contatto | LibraryThing.com | Privacy/Condizioni d'uso | Guida/FAQ | Blog | Negozio | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteche di personaggi celebri | Recensori in anteprima | Informazioni generali | 155,873,788 libri! | Barra superiore: Sempre visibile