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2001: odissea nello spazio (1968)

di Arthur C. Clarke

Altri autori: Stanley Kubrick (Collaboratore)

Altri autori: Vedi la sezione altri autori.

Serie: Odissea nello spazio (1)

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
11,999195430 (4)398
It has been forty years since the publication of this classic science fiction novel that changed the way we look at the stars and ourselves. From the savannas of Africa at the dawn of mankind to the rings of Saturn as man adventures to the outer rim of our solar system, 2001: A Space Odyssey is a journey unlike any other. This allegory about humanity's exploration of the universe, and the universe's reaction to humanity, was the basis for director Stanley Kubrick's immortal film, and lives on as a hallmark achievement in storytelling.… (altro)
Aggiunto di recente daEstragon1958, noisychannel, Scottysteensma, biblioteca privata, beezeedubs, jingo, MichelleSage, nevarferg
Biblioteche di personaggi celebriTerence Kemp McKenna, Walker Percy
  1. 211
    2010 odissea due di Arthur C. Clarke (ksk21, philAbrams)
  2. 110
    Incontro con Rama di Arthur C. Clarke (riodecelis, artturnerjr)
  3. 50
    Contact di Carl Sagan (5hrdrive)
    5hrdrive: A better "first contact" story.
  4. 10
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice di D. Pak (philAbrams)
    philAbrams: Seminal breakthrough works
  5. 00
    Messaggio da Cassiopea di Chloe Zerwick (MinaKelly)
  6. 00
    Shield di Poul Anderson (MinaKelly)
  7. 55
    Io, robot di Isaac Asimov (benmartin79)
  8. 00
    The Memory of Whiteness di Kim Stanley Robinson (Valashain)
    Valashain: Robinson's work shows the same kind of optimism in the future that Clarke seems to have. The style and subject of The Memory of Whiteness reminded me of Clarke most but this goes for other works by Robinson as well.
  9. 23
    Titan di Stephen Baxter (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: The stories have many similarities (mainly a manned expedition to Saturn), though Baxter's story is much darker.
  10. 24
    I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream [short story] di Harlan Ellison (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: Another 60s SF tale that takes the notion of malevolent AI to nightmarish extremes.
1960s (222)
My TBR (16)
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» Vedi le 398 citazioni

Inglese (181)  Spagnolo (4)  Olandese (2)  Slovacco (1)  Francese (1)  Tedesco (1)  Finlandese (1)  Catalano (1)  Portoghese (Portogallo) (1)  Arabo (1)  Tutte le lingue (194)
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Það er með ólíkindum að þessi saga hafi verið skrifuð 1968 því þekking og forspá Clarkes er svo mikil að mikið af því sem hann skrifaði í þessari sögu um geimferðir hefur ræst. Þetta er vel skrifuð saga sem hann vann í upphafi með leikstjóranum Stanley Kubrick við gerð samnefndar kvikmyndar. Bókin var síðar gefin út en er örlítið breytt og hún byggist þar að auki á nokkrum smásögum Clarkes sem hann hafði áður ritað. Hann er því alfarið talinn höfundur sögunnar.
Það helsta sem má finna að sögunni er að hún verður á stundum hæg og langdregin þegar Clarke lýsir einstökum búnaði og aðstæðum af nákvæmni en á móti kemur að geysilega viðamikil þekking hans nýtist vel og hann sér mikið fyrir sér marga hluti sem átti eftir að þróa í áratugi áður en þeir urðu að veruleika. ( )
  SkuliSael | Apr 28, 2022 |
Most Science Fiction contains a leap of imagination, a projection about things or events that may or may not be possible at some time in the future.

2001 's most remarkable attribute is the accuracy of the projections the novel casts upon the year 2001, still 33 years into the future of the publication of the book. The movie upon which it is based also set new horizons for what cinema could achieve.

Consider, for example, this excerpt: " When he tired of official reports and memoranda and minutes, he would plug in his fools-cap-sized information circuit and scan the latest reports from Earth. One by one, he could conjure up the world's major electronic newspapers...Switching to the display unit's short-term memory, he would hold the front page while he quickly searched the headlines and noted the items that interested him."

Recall that in 1968, computers with minimal and memory capacities still fill entire rooms to achieve their work. The laptop, much less the tablet computer, could only be envisioned as the stuff of Sci-Fi, and few Sci-Fi writers were visionary enough to create such marvels.

The book dazzles the aware reader who must constantly recall that virtually every "sci-fi" imaginings in the book later became realities.

In the book, Clarke also develops two themes related to the use of technology. He creates a computer, the HAL 9000, which monitors hundreds of operations at once and works through the oral commands of the astronauts. Thus, in 1968, Clarke projects the wonders of the technology that had yet to be conceived. At the same time, he projects the dystopian ruin that can come from an over-reliance on the power of machine intelligence: HAL turns dangerous, the direct result of artificial intelligence being applied without the benefits of conscience.

The novel does not end in this dystopian view of our future, however. Instead, it carries a warning about humankind's own limitation: its belief that it has discovered and defined the limits of the Universe. In 2001Clarke asserts that humanity has a very great deal still to learn and even more to understand.

It is now twenty years beyond the time setting of the novel. Because of this, Clarke's marvelous novel is unlikely to attract many new readers (and this review is probably in vain). That is unfortunate because 2001: A Space Odysseyis a masterpiece. Like the works of H.G.Wells, George Orwell, Jules Verne, Edger Rice Burroughs, Mary Shelley, and numerous others, this novel is not about some future event; it is about the human mind and soul coping with the realities of Man's future.

It is as good a read today as it was in 1968, a classic by any definition of the word.

( )
  PaulLoesch | Apr 2, 2022 |
Ciencia Ficción
  Peter455 | Mar 30, 2022 |
This read of 2001: A Space Odyssey was my first, and I last watched the film over thirty years ago. The edition in hand is the 1999 "millennium" pocket paperback, with retrospective front matter by Arthur C. Clarke discussing the authorial process. In light of that introduction, I'm a little surprised that Stanley Kubrick didn't get a byline on the novel as a co-author. The book was plotted as a stage of the development of the screenplay, drawing on earlier stories by Clarke and incorporating Kubrick's ideas and ambitions for the film. Then the two parallel media products were completed in dialog with each other. In the end there are some significant differences between the novel and the movie, but the book certainly exposes and clarifies many of the ideas behind the film.

Clarke wrote "hard" sf, with an effort to maintain scientific and social plausibility. So, with the passage of time, his projected world of "2001" now set a generation in our past has come to represent an alternate history, and it's one that makes me nostalgic for turns not taken in our cultural and technological paths. Clarke's 2001 has a manned moon base, and in general space exploration has progressed in preference to the technologies of simulation and social control that have come to dominate our 21st century to this point. He imagined a better diversion of the military-industrial complex into the work of peaceful extraterrestrial inquiry than we have been able to achieve. His geopolitical scenario failed to foresee the collapse of the USSR, but credibly made the USA and USSR allies in tension with China, as the USA and Russia arguably were in our actual 2001.

It was interesting to reflect that one of the conceits of this novel has come to dominate a lot of 21st-century sf: a "first contact" with extra-solar intelligence that is mediated by some sort of archaeological remains. I see this trope in a lot of recent space opera, including MacLeod's Newton's Wake, Harrison's Kefahuchi Tract books, the Expanse series, and even Wells' Murderbot books. I wonder if my library catalog needs an "exo-archaeology" tag to tie these works together.

Another notable feature was the epistemological feint in Chapter 15, where Dave Bowman recovers from a earthbound training simulation thinking at first he is being awoken from hibernation in space. This passage stands as a foil for the protagonist's later alien-curated experiences in the final section of the book, and together they offer a sfnal interrogation of human subjectivity that is not quite phildickian but still savory.

2001 has very short chapters; I usually read three or more in a sitting. These in turn are grouped into six parts: Primeval Night, TMA-1, Between Planets, Abyss, The Moons of Saturn, and Through the Star Gate. The structure suggests an initiatory ascent according to the symbol systems of modern Hermetic Kabbala: Malkuth/Earth (Neophyte), path of tav to Yesod/Luna (Zelator), path of samekh to Tiphareth/Sol (Adeptus Minor), path of gimel and Da'ath (Babe of the Abyss), Binah/Saturn (Magister Templi), and Chokmah/Zodiac (Magus). The initiand in this case would be humanity as a whole, and the viewpoint characters differ from section to section in the first half of the book.

The relationship of Clarke and Kubrick's 2001 to Homer's original Odyssey is not fully obvious. It seems to have been widely understood merely in the sense of episodic adventure over a journey, but my reading of the novel reassured me that the more specific sense of a homeward journey was intended, and this gist is consistent with the mystical progression that I inferred from the divisions of the text. "With eyes that already held more than human intentness, the baby stared into the depths of the crystal monolith, seeing--but not yet understanding--the mysteries that lay beyond. It knew that it had come home, that here was the origin of many races beyond its own; but it also knew that it could not stay" (293, emphasis added). I plan to read further in Clarke's "Odyssey Sequence," and I am curious to see whether the esoteric themes are perpetuated in the later books.
8 vota paradoxosalpha | Feb 2, 2022 |
It's a slow book. But the experience was amazing. ( )
  Nannus | Jan 17, 2022 |

» Aggiungi altri autori (37 potenziali)

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Clarke, Arthur C.autore primariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Kubrick, StanleyCollaboratoreautore secondariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Eis, EgonTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Hill, DickNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Mare, J.B. deTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Moorcock, MichaelIntroduzioneautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Velsen, A. vanProgetto della copertinaautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Wilson, JoeIllustratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
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The drought had lasted now for ten million years, and the reign of the terrible lizards had long since ended. Here on the Equator, in the continent which would one day be known as Africa, the battle for existence had reached a new climax of ferocity, and the victor was not yet in sight.
Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. (Foreword)
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"I'm not going to do that, Dave."
Look Dave, I can see you're really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over.
Now they were lords of the galaxy, and beyond the reach of time. They could rove at will among the stars, and sink like a subtle mist through the very interstices of space. But despite their godlike powers, they had not wholly forgotten their origin, in a worm slime of a vanished sea.
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(Click per vedere. Attenzione: può contenere anticipazioni.)
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Do not under any circumstances combine the film adaptation (DVDs and other video recordings) with the book. These are considered separate and distinct works for LibraryThing cataloging. Also please be careful when editing and deleting information in Common Knowledge, since this is common data that affects everyone in LibraryThing.
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It has been forty years since the publication of this classic science fiction novel that changed the way we look at the stars and ourselves. From the savannas of Africa at the dawn of mankind to the rings of Saturn as man adventures to the outer rim of our solar system, 2001: A Space Odyssey is a journey unlike any other. This allegory about humanity's exploration of the universe, and the universe's reaction to humanity, was the basis for director Stanley Kubrick's immortal film, and lives on as a hallmark achievement in storytelling.

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