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I testamenti

di Margaret Atwood

Altri autori: Vedi la sezione altri autori.

Serie: The Handmaid's Tale (2)

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiConversazioni / Citazioni
3,6101672,672 (4.07)1 / 239
When the van door slammed on Offred’s future at the end of The handmaid’s tale, readers had no way of telling what lay ahead. With The testaments, the wait is over. Margaret Atwood’s sequel picks up the story more than 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of three female narrators from Gilead.… (altro)
  1. 00
    La casa futura del Dio vivente di Louise Erdrich (vwinsloe)
  2. 01
    Abigail di Magda Szabó (Dilara86)
    Dilara86: One is speculative fiction, the other isn't, but they both take place in a girls-only school at a time of war/unrest and describe female microcosms, friendships between teenage girls and ambiguous authority figures.
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Inglese (157)  Olandese (3)  Spagnolo (2)  Tedesco (2)  Francese (2)  Tutte le lingue (166)
1-5 di 166 (prossimo | mostra tutto)
I loveeeeddd this book! I liked handmaid's tale when I read it, but was infuriated by the ending... Or the lack thereof. This book answers so many questions, furthers the story, and provides so much context for the original by providing multiple points of view by new characters in and out of Gilead.

I'm going to have to reread The Handmaid's Tale now with this new info and context in mind.

Definitely recommend, but read this after Handmaid's Tale, if you haven't read that one yet! ( )
  KaffinatedWitch | Oct 15, 2021 |
OK, so. I've never been on the hype train for The Handmaid's Tale like everyone else; I never really felt the need to read it until the graphic adaptation came out, and even then I wasn't blown away like I was supposed to be. It goes without saying that I have no interest in the TV series.

Which means, basically, that I'm going into The Testaments fresh, without any really expectation other than "Margaret Atwood is great." And it's not her best, but it's not so terrible as everyone is complaining about.

Yes, the identities of the girls is pretty obvious, but it's not like it's supposed to be this big twist that the plot hinges on. And yes, Daisy/Jade/Nicole is a little young for the mission she performs, but that was literally the only option they had.

I appreciated the glimpses into what growing up as a young woman in Gilead was really like, and have a newfound and reluctant appreciation for Aunt Lydia. ( )
  Elna_McIntosh | Sep 29, 2021 |
I loved it, I loved it, I loved it.

I have so many feelings and so many thoughts and I was absolutely teary by the end. I predicted the reveals entirely (but not exactly where they ended up at their last scene), and I absolutely loved getting to see more and more of Lydia. I loved how much we saw of the worlds on both sides of the divide. Forever my vote is with Atwood. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
I think it’s more of a 3.5.

The Handmaid’s Tale was never a classic in my head because I had never heard about it, until probably a little while before the announcement of the Hulu series. Even then, I was only compelled to read both that book and 1984 because of their drastically increased sales following the 2016 elections and I wanted to know what the fuss was all about. And I ended up with quite a lot of mixed feelings, the major one of them being dread. But I was never in awe of it in its entirety, only parts of it. So, when I decided to read The Testaments, I had no expectations of being blown away; mostly just a curiosity to know what might have happened next. And for all intents and purposes, this book answers that question very well.

My most significant memory of the reading experience of HT was feeling absolutely horrible and terrified if this was a dystopia that might not be entirely implausible in our future. And that’s why the book still lingers in my mind - the author managed to create such a brilliant world that it evokes such deep emotions in us and obviously some of the things happening around in our world also reinforce the feeling that Gilead might not just be a fictional future. That’s where I think this book misses the mark a bit, because we already are familiar with the world and there’s lot less new to be horrified about. But we do get a brief glimpse of the lives of refugees, the underground operations in Canada and how they try to save women from Gilead and how most of the other countries ignore the atrocities of this regime due to the fear of war. We also get to know more about the inner workings of the Aunts, how they came to be in those positions and how the whole system of Gilead is propped up on a bed of secrets, lies and deceit. I liked these additions to the world but I just didn’t think a lot was added to what we already know.

The writing was the main issue I had with HT - I found it very difficult to follow and maybe it was due to how detached Offred was as a narrator, I felt similarly towards the narrative. Thankfully, this one ended up being much more straightforward and easy to read. There are also multiple POVs, so it was nice getting to know more than one character, but I also felt we never got to know anyone too deeply. The pace is pretty consistent, but a little slow because we can’t be expecting this to be an action packed novel. I really thought the ending would be more suspenseful though, but the buildup wasn’t tense enough and it ended fairly quickly too. However, as someone who found the first book very difficult to get through and the show even more troubling (because of the tough subject, I abandoned it after a few episodes), I thought this was much lighter on the horrors and felt like a normal dystopian novel - which is pretty surprising considering it’s Man Booker Prize nominated.

As this book takes place almost 15 years after the story of Offred in HT, the two young women whom we follow here have grown up in a world where Gilead is a reality. Agnes is the child of a Commander, as such it’s the only world she knows and it’s the only faith she believes in. It’s only after she learns some secrets that she begins to question her faith, and what does she have left if not her beliefs. She was the one character I thought we get to know quite well, her motivations and feelings and her deep seated desires.

On the other hand, Daisy grows up on the other side of the border and even protests about the atrocities of Gilead alongside other Canadian citizens, but when tragedy strikes and some truths are uncovered, she decides to help the underground resistance. While I completely understood her grief and confusion about her life, I thought she acquiesced too easily to the call for action, and most of her plot after that moment felt very unrealistic. I guess I’m still confused if she was brave or just idealistic and naive.

And the surprise POV was of Aunt Lydia. I of course didn’t think I would like reading her words, but I have to say I was surprised. I completely loathed her in HT and while my aversion towards her didn’t reduce, I guess I understood why she did what she did and how she came to be that much of a formidable figure in the power hierarchy of Gilead. And while I have to admire her smarts, cunning and survival skills, I am still unsure about the motivations behind her grand plan. And I definitely would have liked to get more answers about that. But her POV is definitely very refreshing to read because this is the only time we get to read atleast a little about a powerful woman instead of the accounts of countless other oppressed women in this world.

Finally, I don’t think my review of this book is going to change the opinion of anyone who wants to read this book. But I do want to mention that if you are someone who absolutely adored HT and want a true sequel for that book, this one is not it and you may be disappointed. However, if you just want some answers about what eventually may have happened to Gilead and what led to it’s downfall, I think you’ll like this much more. Probably best not to go in with a lot of high expectations. ( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
I loved the Handmaid's Tale, and I liked this book, too. The story takes us back to Gilead, but also to Canada. We learn more about the Aunts and how Gilead is founded and ruled. Not as ground-breaking as the original book, but definitely a good sequel, no reason to be concerned, Dear Reader.
( )
  Enno23 | Aug 15, 2021 |
Agency and strength, Atwood seems to be suggesting, do not require a heroine with the visionary gifts of Joan of Arc, or the ninja skills of a Katniss Everdeen or Lisbeth Salander — there are other ways of defying tyranny, participating in the resistance or helping ensure the truth of the historical record. The very act of writing or recording one’s experiences, Atwood argues, is “an act of hope.” Like messages placed in bottles tossed into the sea, witness testimonies count on someone, somewhere, being there to read their words [...]
 

» Aggiungi altri autori (22 potenziali)

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Atwood, Margaretautore primariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Bar, NomaImmagine di copertinaautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Cardinal, TantooNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Dean, SuzanneProgetto della copertinaautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Dowd, AnnNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Howard, Bryce DallasNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Jacobi, DerekNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Whitman, MaeNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato

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“Every woman is supposed to have the same set of motives, or else to be a monster.” —GEORGE ELIOT, DANIEL DERONDA
“When we look one another in the face, we’re neither of us just looking at a face we hate—no, we’re gazing into a mirror….Do you really not recognize yourselves in us…?” —OBERSTURMBANNFÜHRER LISS TO OLD BOLSHEVIK MOSTOVSKOY, VASILY GROSSMAN, LIFE AND FATE
“Freedom is a heavy load, a great and strange burden for the spirit to undertake….It is not a gift given, but a choice made, and the choice may be a hard one.” —URSULA K. LE GUIN, THE TOMBS OF ATUAN
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When the van door slammed on Offred’s future at the end of The handmaid’s tale, readers had no way of telling what lay ahead. With The testaments, the wait is over. Margaret Atwood’s sequel picks up the story more than 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of three female narrators from Gilead.

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