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The Aging Brain: Proven Steps to Prevent…
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The Aging Brain: Proven Steps to Prevent Dementia and Sharpen Your Mind (edizione 2018)

di Timothy R. Jennings MD (Autore)

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In this easy to use, research-driven guide, a Christian psychiatrist takes an in-depth look at the aging process, showing how we can keep our brains young and prevent dementia, allowing us to maintain vitality, a sharp mind, and independence as we age.
Utente:jdj4tet4life
Titolo:The Aging Brain: Proven Steps to Prevent Dementia and Sharpen Your Mind
Autori:Timothy R. Jennings MD (Autore)
Info:Baker Books (2018), 288 pages
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The Aging Brain: Proven Steps to Prevent Dementia and Sharpen Your Mind di Timothy R. Jennings M.D.

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Summary: A discussion of the causes of aging and brain deterioration and the lifestyle measures that can be taken to avert or delay dementia.

In the area where I live, there has been a boom in construction of "memory care" facilities--nursing facilities that focus on helping seniors dealing with memory and other cognitive losses. One friend, whose parent died recently spoke of saying good bye to them years ago, and finally laying them to rest. As we age, the thought increasingly occurs, could it be us? With that, we may also wonder--is there anything that can be done?

According to Dr. Timothy Jennings, there actually are a number of steps we can take to delay or prevent certain forms of dementia and stay sharp (he does offer a disclaimer that this book does not address all forms of dementia, but particularly late-onset Alzheimer's disease and that any of the interventions in this book should be done in consultation with one's physician).

The good news, in one sense, is that dementia is an issue simply because we are living longer. Yet he maintains as a fundamental principle that brain health and bodily health go hand in hand, in part because so many of our body systems exist to support the functioning of our brains. Even our dental health is connected to brain health. It's not even just a matter of genes. Epigenetics looks at gene expression and certain factors block or facilitate gene expression--diet, smoking, alcohol, pollution and stress being significant factors. Similarly, there are inevitable aging processes in the shortening of the telomeres at the end of our genes which leads to more replication errors. Some of the same factors mentioned above have impact here as well as sun exposure, physical activity, sexually transmitted diseases and relational conflict.

Oxidative stress breaks down the cells in our bodies in the same way that metal rusts. Obesity, diets high in sugar, and alcohol, tobacco, and illegal substances all create oxidative stresses on the body. One of the big takeaways here is that moderate exercise coupled with reduced consumption of all forms of sugar, browned or deep-fried foods, and more vegetables, fruit, fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, and 7-8 hours of sleep seem to be crucial steps.

Exercise and sleep come up in separate chapters. There is clear evidence that moderate exercise for 30-40 minutes a day at least five days a week enhances cognitive abilities. Sleep plays a crucial role in the removal of toxins that build up in the brain during our waking ours. Developing new interests, particularly those that involve both mental and physical learning keep laying down new neural pathways. Beyond this Jennings returns to the importance of practices that reduce stress and that our beliefs matter, where unhealthy views of God may be worse than a well-adjust atheism. Ideally, for him as a believing person, it is a belief system where trust and love for a Creator results in a life of knowing one is loved and expressed in loving.

The last part of the book, on pathological aging, apart from its explanation of the physiology of Alzheimer's disease, and practical considerations for caregivers, seems to review the recommendations made earlier in the book. He does include a chapter on Vitamins and supplements and which are, and are not, helpful. There is an addendum in the book on smoking cessation.

While I found the recommendations practical and instructive, and the research support for these recommendations compelling, it felt a bit that this book might encourage a "if I just do all the right things, I won't have a problem" mentality. Reality doesn't always seem to work that way. What seems evident to me is that these recommendations do make a difference, particularly when measured over large populations. They do seem to enhance our well-being in the absence of any underlying condition. His "use it or lose it" mantra just makes common sense.

We all age, and our brains with the rest of us. But healthy bodies nurtured by healthy lifestyle practices mean healthier brains. Most of us hope, I think, that our bodies won't outlast our brains. While we don't have any guarantees, Jennings helps us understand what we can do, what we should avoid, and how it can help.

____________________________

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. ( )
  BobonBooks | Oct 1, 2018 |
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In this easy to use, research-driven guide, a Christian psychiatrist takes an in-depth look at the aging process, showing how we can keep our brains young and prevent dementia, allowing us to maintain vitality, a sharp mind, and independence as we age.

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