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Persone normali

di Sally Rooney

Altri autori: Vedi la sezione altri autori.

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
3,4561902,838 (3.74)147
Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years. This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person's life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege. Alternating menace with overwhelming tenderness, Sally Rooney's second novel breathes fiction with new life.… (altro)
  1. 50
    Un giorno di David Nicholls (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Normal People is more explicit than One Day, but both of these character-driven novels follow a couple who can't resist each other and come together only to separate over and over again.
  2. 30
    Trust Exercise di Susan Choi (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Though Trust Exercise employs an unconventional storyline that unfolds with stylistically complex flair, and Normal People is more straightforward, both novels play with power dynamics within relationships and explore the limitations of communication.… (altro)
  3. 10
    Parlarne tra amici di Sally Rooney (hazzabamboo)
    hazzabamboo: Her second, and even better - they cover quite similar ground
  4. 00
    In Paris With You di Clementine Beauvais (SandSing7)
    SandSing7: The characters and their relationship are eerily similar, the writing is lovely and poetic (even though Paris is written in verse), and it's super weird that even the endings are exactly the same.
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» Vedi le 147 citazioni

Inglese (175)  Catalano (4)  Olandese (3)  Spagnolo (1)  Svedese (1)  Francese (1)  Tedesco (1)  Tutte le lingue (186)
1-5 di 186 (prossimo | mostra tutto)
May the Gods strike me down mid-sentence but... I'm just not sure I liked this.

I found Rooney's debut novel, Conversations with Friends, captivating and endlessly amusing, so much so that I gave it one of my coveted 5-star reviews. Normal People feels like a shallow retread of the same ground, with a literary style that turned out to be not something the author created for that deeply ironic, often epistolary novel, but in fact merely her way of writing books. And the bloom is, for this reader, off the rose. I usually annotate books fairly thoroughly; here I only made one note - and that was just to investigate where I can buy chlorophyll chewing gum!

Rooney is still fantastic at much of what she does; she vividly captures moments of pathos and bathos jammed together, our subtle self-delusions to which Time gradually draws our attention, and a certain detached air with which the characters regard their own lives. Both Marianne and Connell have moments of compelling insight, although I would say only the former truly emerges as a fully-realised character. But I felt more and more that the relationship didn't deserve this level of interrogation. I don't wish to commit the grievous sin of comparing a writer's second novel to their first - I really don't - yet much of the playful irony and rich naivete of Conversations' main characters has been lost and replaced by an endless yearning that didn't always feel earned by the context of these two young attractive people. Moreso the supporting characters felt empty (poor, neglected Helen), without the shading and authorial question marks found in the earlier novel. I'm also less convinced - still convinced but only just so - of Rooney's penchant for avoiding quotation marks. In an otherwise typographically standard novel, is it well-motivated? (And, while I enjoy Rooney's heightened dialogue and her self-consciously intelligent characters, I wasn't fully convinced by some of the subsidiary dialogue. Would a highschool student really call something "awfully fucking gay?" I accept that some uneducated kids ten years ago still used the word "gay" as a generic term for something rubbish, but I so strongly associate "awfully" with the kind of prep-school educated classes that the two words strike my ear unnaturally when employed in the one phrase.)

Most disappointingly for me, however, was that I never warmed to the narrative conceit of cutting to various moments in the characters' relationship. To be honest, it comes dangerously close to cheating. Rooney will skip ahead four months, surprising us with Connell and Marianne in a new status quo, only to spend half the chapter giving us flashbacks to what occurred during those four months. As the seasoned reader, I would like to do some of the work for myself; as the novelist, I would like Rooney to create some shadows, some lacunae in the text, with which the reader can do battle. Instead, the time-jumps simply feel like a "hook" for reviewers to discuss the work, creating an aura of structure yet explicitly revealing all that has taken place in the intervening weeks and months.

Still, no-one can deny the splash this novel has made, and it's damned impressive that Rooney has had two such well-received books before the age of 30. It's easy to understand why so many people enjoy her works. Reading her novels, I feel the same sense of generational frisson that I find when watching a TV series like Girls or Broad City: an ecstatic realisation that my generation are at last being represented accurately. No longer forced, as we have been in novels and films created by older artists, to awkwardly re-enact our parents' cultural, sexual, and social mores, but instead freed to be ourselves. That was almost worth the price of admission. Rooney is a writer to watch, and one whose next novel I will keenly await. ( )
  therebelprince | Oct 5, 2021 |
How would I describe this book? I guess I would begin with the title. It's a book about Normal People, a Normal Book one could say, and the only thing that at first teenage blush marks this as a Different Book is the level of detail of micro interactions between characters. This is where the writing shines: The analysis of small, normally invisible gestures that, when fully reported on, gain an outsized significance, and even become mildly addicting in their ability to capture the alertness of people in a relationship. One realizes this will be the case within the first page or so, with a line like: "He puts his hands in his pockets and suppresses an irritable sigh, but suppresses it with an audible intake of breath, so that it still sounds like a sigh." It's a simple description that opens up a portal to the character's interiority, the way he tries to present himself, and it even tell us that he's an anxious being, someone who *suppresses* his emotional displays.

I was very engrossed in this book. Even as it told a very basic story, I was hungry for those moments. between characters.
( )
  Gadi_Cohen | Sep 22, 2021 |
I was so ready to give it 4 stars, maybe even a 5 star rating by midway but then some quotes said by the main characters(especially Connell) dropped it to a two suddenly .

I’m so conflicted, I really enjoyed moments of the book delving into the pair’s shared struggles with themselves. But I really detested how bad both were at communication for the most part. They’re not even teens! And I thought there was going to be a final conclusive message for self acceptance but I guess the book wants to be more genuine for this generation of readers and says f that to my wish. For now, this will be a 3 star read… ( )
  violetbaleine | Sep 22, 2021 |
3.5 stars
Normal People is a great character study and is very well written. While reading I couldn't help but root for Connell and Marianne to end up together. As the ending is rather open we don't really get to know if they do, but such strong personalities and destiny constantly pushing them into each other's paths maybe their story together isn't over.

“Marianne had the sense that her real life was happening somewhere very far away, happening without her, and she didn't know if she would ever find out where it was or become part of it.” ( )
  _Marcia_94_ | Sep 21, 2021 |
There's not a lot of substance to this. ( )
  Clare_L | Sep 20, 2021 |
[T]he idealized reading experience Rooney casts for her young writer is a magnetic mingling of literary minds that sharpens an intelligence capable not merely of imagining others but of imagining how to be close to them, even how to live with the responsibility of their happiness and dreams.
 
[U]pon critical reflection, the novel’s territory comes to seem like more fog than not. Which is to say: it’s a novel about university life, but without collegiate descriptions or interactions with professors or references to intellectual histories or texts; about growing up, but without any adults [. . .]; about Ireland, but without any sense of place, national history, or even physical description (if Joyce wrote Ulysses in order that Dublin might be reconstructed brick by brick, you’d be hard pressed to even break ground using Normal People); about Connell becoming a writer, but without any meaningful access to his interior development, or any sense conveyed of how his creative “passion” inflects his life; and, finally, about Marianne and Connell’s intertwined fate where we are only intermittently given access to sustained moments of intimacy.
 
Rooney's slivers of insight into how Marianne and Connell wrestle with their emotions and question their identity in the process made it one of the most realistic portrayals of young love I've read. Their relationship is rife with mistakes, misunderstandings, and missed chances that could be simplified if only they communicated and didn't subconsciously suppress their feelings, as millennials are wont to do.
 
Here, youth, love and cowardice are unavoidably intertwined, distilled into a novel that demands to be read compulsively, in one sitting.
 
[W]hile Rooney may write about apparent aimlessness and all the distractions of our age, her novels are laser-focused and word-perfect. They build power by a steady accretion of often simple declarative sentences that track minuscule shifts in feelings.
 

» Aggiungi altri autori

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Rooney, Sallyautore primariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Baardman, GerdaTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Balmelli, MauriziaTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Lindell, KlaraTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
McMahon, AoifeNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Pellisa, IngaTraduttoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Riera, ErnestTraductorautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato

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It is one of the secrets in that change of mental poise which has been fitly named conversion, that to many among us neither heaven nor earth has any revelation till some personality touches theirs with a peculiar influence, subduing them into receptiveness.
George Eliot, Daniel Deronda
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Incipit
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JANUARY 2011

Marianne answers the door when Connell rings the bell.
Citazioni
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It feels powerful to him to put an experience down in words, like he's trapping it in a jar and it can never fully leave him.
That's money, the substance that makes the world real. There's something so corrupt and sexy about it.
Outside her breath rises in a fine mist and the snow keeps falling, like a ceaseless repetition of the same infinitesimally small mistake.
His appearance is like a favorite piece of music to her, sounding a little different each time she hears it.
Not for the first time Marianne thinks cruelty does not only hurt the victim, but the perpetrator also, and maybe more deeply and more permanently. You learn nothing very profound about yourself simply by being bullied; but by bullying someone else you learn something you can never forget.
Ultime parole
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(Click per vedere. Attenzione: può contenere anticipazioni.)
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Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years. This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person's life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege. Alternating menace with overwhelming tenderness, Sally Rooney's second novel breathes fiction with new life.

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