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The salt path di Raynor Winn
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The salt path (originale 2018; edizione 2018)

di Raynor Winn

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
5253534,403 (3.93)45
"Just days after Raynor Winn learns that Moth, her husband of thirty-two years, is terminally ill, their house and farm are taken away, along with their livelihood. With nothing left and little time, they make the brave and impulsive decision to walk the 630 miles of the sea-swept South West Coast Path, from Somerset to Dorset, through Devon and Cornwall. Carrying only the essentials for survival on their backs, they live wild in the ancient, weathered landscape of cliffs, sea, and sky. Yet through every step, every encounter, and every test along the way, their walk becomes a remarkable and life-affirming journey. Powerfully written and unflinchingly honest, The Salt Path is ultimately a portrayal of home--how it can be lost, rebuilt, and rediscovered in the most unexpected ways"--… (altro)
Utente:CoriatLib
Titolo:The salt path
Autori:Raynor Winn
Info:New York, New York : Penguin Books, 2018.
Collezioni:La tua biblioteca
Voto:
Etichette:A sense of Home taken away; family; friends and doubt. Faith in self.

Informazioni sull'opera

The Salt Path di Raynor Winn (2018)

Aggiunto di recente dabiblioteca privata, VivienneR, skyeval, joanbahr, ebenizer, SalemAthenaeum, rhian_of_oz, ShawIslandLibrary, Arina42
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An amazing gripping tale of survival after tragedy inspires and educates us.
  CoriatLib | May 4, 2021 |
Het verhaal is mooi maar snel verteld. Een man krijgt de diagnose van een ongeneeslijke ziekte, en het stel wordt om andere redenen hun huis uitgezet. Ze besluiten een kustpad in zuid-west Engeland te lopen, met een tent en heel weinig geld. Ze leven als daklozen, met dat verschil is dat zij steeds in beweging zijn. De continue beweging doen de man goed, en zijn ziekte lijkt een halt te worden toegeroepen. Het is natuurlijk een tocht die de hoofdpersonen terugbrengt tot de essentie. Leven in de natuur, van dag tot dag, zonder een ander doel dan overleven.Mogelijk komt het door de vertaling, maar ik ondervind niet hoe ‘fijngevoelig, poëtisch en sensitief’ het boek volgens trouw is. ( )
  gerrit-anne | Mar 31, 2021 |
Very mixed feelings about this book. Let's start with the good side.

Raynor Winn is an excellent writer. The style is flowing well, never feels constructed or awkward. She navigates along "inspirational" and even "spiritual" subjects without ever getting on my nerves. Mostly because of her straight-forward voice and those of her characters, which is the same, I guess. Even her husband Moth doesn't seem to be a character of his own. The couple feels like one character, struggling with the adverse situations always as one. I guess this is exactly what she wanted to bring across.

The first chapters I really liked. The emotional roller-coaster of a life spiraling into darkness was very well written. I cried at the scene of the old ewe that decided to die. Also the overall slow trajectory of getting from wrecked anxious couple to strong and independent "salted blackberries" wasn't lost on me. But the middle part of the book I really didn't enjoy. Too slow, not very credible (which is of course weird in a memoir), too repetitive. The little story lines that were sprinkled in felt very much like that: deliberately added because it was missing something. The background stories on the regions they pass through were (again) well-written and mildly interesting, but also clearly filler. From the winter on, it got more interesting again, with less predictable plot and some real development in the situation of the couple.

So all-in-all a nice and somewhat inspiring book, but not great. I really had a problem understanding the WHY of their situation. Surely, if you are in such a dire situation, there must be people you can ask for help. I understand that not many friends can indefinitely accommodate two extra people in their home, but I would expect just about anyone in their 50s to have a bit more social capital than this. I guess these people have just been very inward focused over the pre-book years. If you live in a small rural village for decades and raise two children there and then lose your house and livelihood in such an unjust way, I would imagine some support from neighbours and friends from the village. But maybe I'm wrong.

One more thing: there was one sentiment that this book described very well and which resonated with me: the feeling of dread for the end of a journey. Traveling on a long train ride or flight always has this effect on me. Of course I'm on that flight to get somewhere, I don't particularly enjoy being on a plane, but when the destination comes in sight, I always hope that it will take a little longer. I feel comfortable in the known, settled uncomfortable place I'm in and start dreading the uncertainty of leaving. The last few chapters captured this very well. How you can feel anxious about the nearing end of the journey, however harsh, back-breaking and unsafe your journey is. ( )
  teunduynstee | Feb 25, 2021 |
Raynor Winn had never written anything for publication before this book, and boy was she hiding her light under a bushel. Her turn of phrase is exquisite in this first book, and she nails that fine line of writing sublimely about nature without falling into the wordsmith trap of over-baking her descriptions.

This is her tale of a journey living with nature borne out of necessity. A country girl all her life, she and her husband Moth lived in their remote Welsh farm for decades, raising their children there, literally making the house habitable with their own two hands and enjoying a modest income from holidaymakers who came to stay in their barn conversion. When an investment in a good friend's business goes wrong, they find themselves on the hook for outstanding payments to creditors, and in the blink of an eye their house and their business is recovered by the bailiffs. In that same week, Winn's husband Moth is diagnosed with a terminal wasting disease. With no home, no income and a devastating prognosis for her husband, despite his deteriorating health they decide to take themselves off to walk and wild camp the Salt Path, a 600 odd mile path around Britain's south west coast.

This is a beautifully written book about finding one's self in the midst of the most terrible circumstances simply by being at one with nature and the elements. With only £40 in Government money coming in every few weeks, they subsist on the bare minimum of food with woefully sub-standard kit for the conditions, yet somewhere along this journey as two newly homeless people in their 50s they find a reason to go on, a reason to wake up in the morning. It's what lies beyond their journey on the path that becomes most terrifying in all senses.

I love this kind of book that's part travelogue, part homage to nature, and will be making a point of seeking out more titles from the Wainright prize shortlist. If you enjoy Robert Macfarlane type of books, The Salt Path is highly recommended. I'll be keeping an eye out for the follow up The Wild Silence. This is an author who deserves on so many fronts the success she's now carving out as an author.

4 stars - surprisingly beautiful writing. ( )
  AlisonY | Feb 22, 2021 |
I pretty much devoured this as both an audiobook and ebook in a couple of days. A middle-aged couple (well '50s) lose their home and the husband is diagnosed with an incurable illness and they decide to walk the south-west coast path from beginning to end. I love reading about through hikes, and this one is right in my back yard but I have walked very little of it myself. It makes me want to get myself a tent and just head off into the sunset. Inspiring stuff. ( )
  CharlotteBurt | Feb 1, 2021 |
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Ha un sequel (non seriale)

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Part One: Into the Light

Tell me about a man,

Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost ...

Homer, The Odyssey
Part Two: The South West Coast Path

While some might be daunted at the prospect of walking, for weeks on end, staying somewhere different every night, while keeping themselves fed and watered, it is simply a matter of careful planning.

-Paddy Dillon, The South West Coast Path: From Minehead to South Haven Point.
Part Three: The Long Fetch

Often, for undaunted courage, fate spares the man it has not already marked.

-Seamus Heaney, Beowulf
Part Four: Lightly Salted Blackberries

Spoilt for choice - which one to throw,

which to pocket and take home.

-Simon Armitage, "The Stone Beach"
Part Five: Choices

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread.

-John Muir, The Yosemite
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For the team
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Prologue: There's a sound to breaking waves when they're close, a sound like nothing else.
Chapter 1. Dust of Life

I was under the stairs when I decided to walk.
Citazioni
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Packing a rucksack when you're fifty just isn't the same as when you're twenty.

Thirty years on and I had the aches of wenty years of manual labor, damage that never quite heals but stays malevolently in the background. (p. 22)
"I think I can feel homelessness now, like a balloon cut free in the wind. I'm scared.

"I'd hug you, Ray, but I can't sit up."

"Shall we eat the meatballs? I'm sure they weight the most." (p. 41)
The path led into the valley and down to Culbone Church, the smallest church in England, ancient, and once the site of a leper colony. I sat in the graveyard and let the utterly peaceful place wash over me. It was profoundly spiritual, nothing to do with God or religion, but a deeply human spirituality. (p. 45)
"Do we have a plan?"

"Course we do. We walk until we stop walking, and maybe on the way we find some kind of future." (p. 48)
Rather than layers of sweaty salt, my legs were crawling in ladybirds.

But they were too special and the shiny red wonders too numerous: there had to be more to it than that; they had to have a meaning for us.

No, I couldn't be scientific about it, and clung to the myth of the lady bird bringing good luck, carrying it with me in a rosy, spotted glow. I watched the pink aura lift from Moth and tried to believe in miracles. (p. 79)
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"Just days after Raynor Winn learns that Moth, her husband of thirty-two years, is terminally ill, their house and farm are taken away, along with their livelihood. With nothing left and little time, they make the brave and impulsive decision to walk the 630 miles of the sea-swept South West Coast Path, from Somerset to Dorset, through Devon and Cornwall. Carrying only the essentials for survival on their backs, they live wild in the ancient, weathered landscape of cliffs, sea, and sky. Yet through every step, every encounter, and every test along the way, their walk becomes a remarkable and life-affirming journey. Powerfully written and unflinchingly honest, The Salt Path is ultimately a portrayal of home--how it can be lost, rebuilt, and rediscovered in the most unexpected ways"--

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