Pagina principaleGruppiConversazioniEsploraStatistiche
Cerca nel Sito
Questo sito utilizza i cookies per fornire i nostri servizi, per migliorare le prestazioni, per analisi, e (per gli utenti che accedono senza fare login) per la pubblicità. Usando LibraryThing confermi di aver letto e capito le nostre condizioni di servizio e la politica sulla privacy. Il tuo uso del sito e dei servizi è soggetto a tali politiche e condizioni.
Hide this

Risultati da Google Ricerca Libri

Fai clic su di un'immagine per andare a Google Ricerca Libri.

Dopesick di Beth Macy
Sto caricando le informazioni...

Dopesick (edizione 2018)

di Beth Macy (Autore)

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
7044525,356 (4.1)42
An instant New York Times and indie bestseller, Dopesick is the only book to fully chart the devastating opioid crisis in America: "a harrowing, deeply compassionate dispatch from the heart of a national emergency" (New York Times) from a bestselling author and journalist who has lived through it In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of America's twenty-plus year struggle with opioid addiction. From distressed small communities in Central Appalachia to wealthy suburbs; from disparate cities to once-idyllic farm towns; it's a heartbreaking trajectory that illustrates how this national crisis has persisted for so long and become so firmly entrenched. Beginning with a single dealer who lands in a small Virginia town and sets about turning high school football stars into heroin overdose statistics, Macy endeavors to answer a grieving mother's question-why her only son died-and comes away with a harrowing story of greed and need. From the introduction of OxyContin in 1996, Macy parses how America embraced a medical culture where overtreatment with painkillers became the norm. In some of the same distressed communities featured in her bestselling book Factory Man, the unemployed use painkillers both to numb the pain of joblessness and pay their bills, while privileged teens trade pills in cul-de-sacs, and even high school standouts fall prey to prostitution, jail, and death. Through unsparing, yet deeply human portraits of the families and first responders struggling to ameliorate this epidemic, each facet of the crisis comes into focus. In these politically fragmented times, Beth Macy shows, astonishingly, that the only thing that unites Americans across geographic and class lines is opioid drug abuse. But in a country unable to provide basic healthcare for all, Macy still finds reason to hope-and signs of the spirit and tenacity necessary in those facing addiction to build a better future for themselves and their families. "Everyone should read Beth Macy's story of the American opioid epidemic" -- Professor Anne C Case, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University and Sir Angus Deaton, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics… (altro)
Utente:boo-radley
Titolo:Dopesick
Autori:Beth Macy (Autore)
Info:
Collezioni:La tua biblioteca
Voto:****
Etichette:Non-Fiction, E-Book

Informazioni sull'opera

Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America di Beth Macy

Sto caricando le informazioni...

Iscriviti per consentire a LibraryThing di scoprire se ti piacerà questo libro.

Attualmente non vi sono conversazioni su questo libro.

» Vedi le 42 citazioni

Death Along I-81

People should read Dopesick for many good reasons, among them to understand how this current drug addiction crisis evolved, to see how a needed drug for a limited population morphed into an epidemic with aggressive sales tactics promoting it beyond its purpose, to witness how lax government regulatory enforcement encouraged bad actors, to learn how an entrepreneurial medical profession was coopted, yet again, by a cunning pharmaceutical company, and to discover methods for helping addicts get and stay off drugs.

But beyond these reasons, most of all, people should read Dopesick to see that the addicted are human beings, just like we readers, who, often through no fault of their own, find themselves hooked on a drug prescribed to ease their pain. Macy takes us into the lives of the addicted, parents of the addicted, law enforcers trying to stem the trade, and all manner of doctors, nurses, and researchers looking for effective methods of breaking addiction and keeping it broken. Because the book teems with heartbreak, most will not find it easy to get through.

This exploration of opioid addiction begins in the mountains of western Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and northwestern North Carolina: Appalachia; and in Connecticut, home of Purdue Pharma, developers and distributors of OxyContin (a synthesized pain reliever similar to morphine) and its derivatives. It details Purdue’s aggressive marketing and sales approach to pushing out the drug, including the medical profession’s adoption of pain as the fifth vital sign (you’ve seen the ten degrees of pain in doctors’ offices).

Prescribing became common, even for pain that could easily be managed with over the counter analgesics, and those scripts often included thirty-day supplies. Once hooked, users implored and tricked doctors into extending their scripts. Then they resorted to any means of raising funds. Finally, when Oxy became too expensive, they turned to something that was not only cheaper but easier to get, that also delivered the intense high they sought, heroin. To fund their addictions, many turned into low-level dealers. And because the body adapts to opioids, users constantly needed to up their dosages not just to achieve the initial highs but to stave off the sickness engendered by dope deprivation. Which is why you hear of addicts flocking to suppliers whose customers have died of overdoses.

When you drive I-81 through the Appalachians, you enjoy some of the most beautiful scenery in the U.S. What you don’t see is the poverty and depression along the route. Beth Macy takes you off the highway into the byways where began and stills rages one of America’s worst health crises. It’s a difficult and often harrowing journey worth you time.

( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Death Along I-81

People should read Dopesick for many good reasons, among them to understand how this current drug addiction crisis evolved, to see how a needed drug for a limited population morphed into an epidemic with aggressive sales tactics promoting it beyond its purpose, to witness how lax government regulatory enforcement encouraged bad actors, to learn how an entrepreneurial medical profession was coopted, yet again, by a cunning pharmaceutical company, and to discover methods for helping addicts get and stay off drugs.

But beyond these reasons, most of all, people should read Dopesick to see that the addicted are human beings, just like we readers, who, often through no fault of their own, find themselves hooked on a drug prescribed to ease their pain. Macy takes us into the lives of the addicted, parents of the addicted, law enforcers trying to stem the trade, and all manner of doctors, nurses, and researchers looking for effective methods of breaking addiction and keeping it broken. Because the book teems with heartbreak, most will not find it easy to get through.

This exploration of opioid addiction begins in the mountains of western Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and northwestern North Carolina: Appalachia; and in Connecticut, home of Purdue Pharma, developers and distributors of OxyContin (a synthesized pain reliever similar to morphine) and its derivatives. It details Purdue’s aggressive marketing and sales approach to pushing out the drug, including the medical profession’s adoption of pain as the fifth vital sign (you’ve seen the ten degrees of pain in doctors’ offices).

Prescribing became common, even for pain that could easily be managed with over the counter analgesics, and those scripts often included thirty-day supplies. Once hooked, users implored and tricked doctors into extending their scripts. Then they resorted to any means of raising funds. Finally, when Oxy became too expensive, they turned to something that was not only cheaper but easier to get, that also delivered the intense high they sought, heroin. To fund their addictions, many turned into low-level dealers. And because the body adapts to opioids, users constantly needed to up their dosages not just to achieve the initial highs but to stave off the sickness engendered by dope deprivation. Which is why you hear of addicts flocking to suppliers whose customers have died of overdoses.

When you drive I-81 through the Appalachians, you enjoy some of the most beautiful scenery in the U.S. What you don’t see is the poverty and depression along the route. Beth Macy takes you off the highway into the byways where began and stills rages one of America’s worst health crises. It’s a difficult and often harrowing journey worth you time.

( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
I really enjoyed reading this book. I am a public health student and eventually I want to get my master in public health and the topic of addiction is of particular interest to me. This book left me feeling very informed about opioid addiction and the spread of the opioid addiction crisis. I knew the basics of the crisis before reading this because of various classes I have taken but this gave me much more background information and personal stories that I did not know before. Addiction is something people don’t really like to talk about and something a lot of people believe only happens to people that make bad choices or can’t control themselves. Most people suffering from opioid addiction were prescribed drugs they were told were safe and then became addicted. Addiction is much more complicated than someone just being a bad person and there are many different factors that make a person likely to develop an addiction such as family history of mental health. I think this book does a good job showing how complex addiction is and I would recommend this to anyone who wants to learn more about addiction and the opioid crisis. ( )
  AKBouterse | Oct 14, 2021 |
nonfiction (opiate crisis personal stories connected with)

I really hope something happens to the Sackler family and the doctors who (continue to) overprescribe; it's really easy to become addicted (even "normal" people) just by following your doctor's instructions; odds for recovery really dismal; MAT (medication-assisted therapy) is not perfect but is basically the best option for not relapsing/dying--5 years of MAT or more (along with other guided support/therapy) gives you OK odds at recovery, but it's not readily available or affordable.
This book was great at explaining the crisis and promoting empathy for the addicted and their families. Highly recommended for everyone, since by now everyone knows someone who is affected. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
A depressing topic and thus depressing book, but also very well researched and presented. Goes over the Purdue/Oxycontin problem, as well as the epidemic (especially in Appalachia) and treatment options (recovery centers, various medication therapies, etc.). I knew a lot of this before (although not so much the politics around the second and third generation medication therapies), but it also did a great job of describing the family problems during an addict's multi-year decline and demise. If I had kids, "offspring don't become a junkie" would be pretty high on my list of concerns. Also was a very good audiobook, read by the author. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
nessuna recensione | aggiungi una recensione

» Aggiungi altri autori

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Beth Macyautore primariotutte le edizionicalcolato
Macy, BethNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Devi effettuare l'accesso per contribuire alle Informazioni generali.
Per maggiori spiegazioni, vedi la pagina di aiuto delle informazioni generali.
Titolo canonico
Titolo originale
Titoli alternativi
Data della prima edizione
Personaggi
Luoghi significativi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Eventi significativi
Film correlati
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Premi e riconoscimenti
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Epigrafe
Dedica
Incipit
Citazioni
Ultime parole
Nota di disambiguazione
Redattore editoriale
Elogi
Lingua originale
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
DDC/MDS Canonico
LCC canonico

Risorse esterne che parlano di questo libro

Wikipedia in inglese

Nessuno

An instant New York Times and indie bestseller, Dopesick is the only book to fully chart the devastating opioid crisis in America: "a harrowing, deeply compassionate dispatch from the heart of a national emergency" (New York Times) from a bestselling author and journalist who has lived through it In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of America's twenty-plus year struggle with opioid addiction. From distressed small communities in Central Appalachia to wealthy suburbs; from disparate cities to once-idyllic farm towns; it's a heartbreaking trajectory that illustrates how this national crisis has persisted for so long and become so firmly entrenched. Beginning with a single dealer who lands in a small Virginia town and sets about turning high school football stars into heroin overdose statistics, Macy endeavors to answer a grieving mother's question-why her only son died-and comes away with a harrowing story of greed and need. From the introduction of OxyContin in 1996, Macy parses how America embraced a medical culture where overtreatment with painkillers became the norm. In some of the same distressed communities featured in her bestselling book Factory Man, the unemployed use painkillers both to numb the pain of joblessness and pay their bills, while privileged teens trade pills in cul-de-sacs, and even high school standouts fall prey to prostitution, jail, and death. Through unsparing, yet deeply human portraits of the families and first responders struggling to ameliorate this epidemic, each facet of the crisis comes into focus. In these politically fragmented times, Beth Macy shows, astonishingly, that the only thing that unites Americans across geographic and class lines is opioid drug abuse. But in a country unable to provide basic healthcare for all, Macy still finds reason to hope-and signs of the spirit and tenacity necessary in those facing addiction to build a better future for themselves and their families. "Everyone should read Beth Macy's story of the American opioid epidemic" -- Professor Anne C Case, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University and Sir Angus Deaton, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics

Non sono state trovate descrizioni di biblioteche

Descrizione del libro
Riassunto haiku

Copertine popolari

Link rapidi

Voto

Media: (4.1)
0.5
1
1.5
2 9
2.5 2
3 22
3.5 10
4 49
4.5 17
5 56

Sei tu?

Diventa un autore di LibraryThing.

 

A proposito di | Contatto | LibraryThing.com | Privacy/Condizioni d'uso | Guida/FAQ | Blog | Negozio | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteche di personaggi celebri | Recensori in anteprima | Informazioni generali | 165,995,930 libri! | Barra superiore: Sempre visibile