Pagina principaleGruppiConversazioniEsploraStatistiche
Cerca nel Sito
Questo sito utilizza i cookies per fornire i nostri servizi, per migliorare le prestazioni, per analisi, e (per gli utenti che accedono senza fare login) per la pubblicità. Usando LibraryThing confermi di aver letto e capito le nostre condizioni di servizio e la politica sulla privacy. Il tuo uso del sito e dei servizi è soggetto a tali politiche e condizioni.
Hide this

Risultati da Google Ricerca Libri

Fai clic su di un'immagine per andare a Google Ricerca Libri.

Sto caricando le informazioni...

Miss Lonelyhearts & The Day of the Locust

di Nathanael West

Altri autori: Gilda Kuhlman (Progetto della copertina)

Altri autori: Vedi la sezione altri autori.

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
2,077356,405 (3.89)120
"Miss Lonelyhearts -- compared by Flannery O'Connor to Faulkner's As I Lay Dying -- is about a newspaper reporter assigned to write the agony column, but, caught up in a vision of suffering, he seeks a way out (through art, sex, religion), only to be rebuffed at every turn by his cynical editor Shrike. The Day of the Locust -- considered by many to be the best novel ever written about Hollywood -- is about Tod Hackett, who hopes for a career in set design only to discover the boredom and emptiness of Hollywood's inhabitants. In the end, only blood will serve. The day of the locust is at hand ..."--Publisher's website.… (altro)
Sto caricando le informazioni...

Iscriviti per consentire a LibraryThing di scoprire se ti piacerà questo libro.

Attualmente non vi sono conversazioni su questo libro.

» Vedi le 120 citazioni

According to the back cover: "Nathanael West died almost unknown in 1940" - fairly young in a car crash. "Miss Lonelyhearts" is about a newspaper columnist who gets emotionally sucked into the dilemmas of the people who write in to him. A novel of conscience, set in an often conscienceless profession. "The Day of the Locust" is a critique of Hollywood - later made into a Hollywood movie. I'm 'reviewing' his 4 novels here out of my usual alphabetical order that I'm working thru my lit section in b/c I just read this in Lewis Yablonsky's great bk "Robopaths" last nite:

Literary works abound with descriptive appraisals of the condition of "common people," their proclivity for ahuman acts, and their general simmering hostility. One perceptive literary analyst of this genre of the "silent majority" of robopaths was the brilliant novelist, Nathanael West, who revealed some dimensions of the problem. In the late thirties he came to Hollywood and trained his literary camera not on the movie studios or the stars, but on the "common people" who, as West's central character in The Day of the Locust states, "came to California to die." West, through this character, wrote:

"All their lives they had slaved at some kind of dull, heavy labor, behind desks and counters, in the fields and at tedious machines of all sorts, saving their pennies and dreaming of the leisure that would be theirs when they had enough. Finally that day came. . . . Where else could they go but to California, the land of sunshine and oranges?

"Once there, they discover that sunshine isn't enough. . . . Nothing happens. They don't know what to do with their time. . . . Their boredom becomes more and more terrible. They realize that they've been tricked and burn with resentment. . . . Nothing can ever be violent enough to make taut their slack minds and bodies. They have been cheated and betrayed. They have slaved and slaved for nothing."

In The Day of the Locust a central character is Tod Hackett, a young painter who is planning a painting called "The burning of Los Angeles." (Interestingly, this artisitic and literary speculation is already a reality.) [Yablonsky's bk was published in 1972 so he's presumably referring to the Watts riots of 1968(?) here] The book ends with the "living dead" masses venting their frustration and hostility in a mad riot of fire that sets off the burning of other cities throughout the country. West, like Moreno, Capek, Huxley, and Orwell, has turned out to be a seer of an incipient apocalypse nurtured by robopathic leaders and followers in contemporary social machine societies. ( )
  tENTATIVELY | Apr 3, 2022 |
(Miss Lonelyhearts review) A re-read, according to my records, for one of my f2f reading groups.

This is a dark, dark classic. A young man, having accepted a job as a agony columnist with a title 'Miss Lonelyheats', finds himself driven to despair by the letters he receives, and the lack of help he can provide. By turns angry, cynical, depressed, helpless, drunk, he searches for some sort of meaning, while being teased and scorned by his fellow journalists, who are misogynistic and cynical in the extreme, venting their anger on whoever they perceive as weaker and more downtrodden than they are. Through the story, he is only referred to by his title, teased, emasculated and virtually erased. By turns he gets involved with one of the letter-writers, a predatory woman married to a man she scorns; tries to find solace with a woman he has proposed to recently but cannot really connect with; is haunted by an obsession with belief and unbelief and ferocious nightmares.

This whole novella felt like a nightmare to me, almost underground, set in 1932, in dark speakeasies and bare apartments. In one episode, he and his fiancee attempt to go back to the land, try to recreate in a weekend the Eden out of which all people have been cast, but it doesn't help. At the very end, having found what might have been an epiphany, he encounters violence, making him in some ways a Christ figure but not guaranteeing any redemption. ( )
  ffortsa | Oct 7, 2021 |
Dark, spare novella - almost feels like a sketch for a longer work. ( )
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
# First "review" #

Finally getting around to this little nail-bomb of a book that I've had shoved in my face almost every time I've read a book that has anything to do with American literature. I knew it was considered to be a searing work but I don't think I was quite ready for this caliber of laceration. West manages to parade the whole spectrum of human emotion and questioning on the edge of a cold, glinting razor. The unnamed character behind the Miss Lonelyhearts persona represents the Christian who struggles under the weight of the missives of suffering that bear down on his life. Playing counterpoint to Miss Lonelyhearts is his boss, Mr. Shrike, who symbolizes the hedonism of the pagan Renaissance humanist: "'Forget the crucifixion, remember the Renaissance'" he tell his underling (5). In roughly fifty-eight pages, we follow Miss Lonelyhearts as he plunges into despair and, as the final subheading tells us, has a religious experience (surely one of the most poetically shattering of endings). West certainly goes for viscera in this one, though he isn't above a little Pynchonian slapstick comedy (forgive the anachronism). "Men have always fought their misery with dreams. Although dreams were once powerful, they have been made puerile by the movies, radio and newspapers" (39). On this stance, we get a story ripped free of the puerility of dreams.

# Second "review" #

I think I may need to start making MISS LONELYHEARTS mandatory quarterly reading. There were so many new things that I missed on my first read. I cannot believe how much West packed into 57 pages. This is a masterclass on short story writing that is both artistic and meaningful--it excels at aesthetics and content. I think I'll make a video talking about it soon. ( )
  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
Overall, the "grotesques" (as described by F. Scott Fitzgerald) in the books (two for one!) really cut through to describe the beginning of what I'd call late stage capitalism. I am, as ever, a fan of succinct wordplay, and the fact that you get so much character information and development in such short works makes these pieces masterful. I confess I almost gave these three stars because of some triggering sections, but perhaps that's the point? Now, I'll take each in turn, and below the reviews will be another section with my favorite quotes, because I can't not pull them.

Miss Lonelyhearts

In the words of Fall Out Boy (dare I!?), Miss Lonelyhearts has a "loony god complex." Women from across New York City write with truly terrible situations in which they are stuck largely because they are women. The only real options for them--to my mind--seem to be "do nothing" or "overturn the patriarchy." Cut back to Miss Lonelyhearts who can't unsee these terrible stories which haunt him, but perhaps because he is a "he" and because he is the (nonbelieving?) son of a preacher, he writes back with empty posturing. Miss Lonelyhearts is stuck in his own turmoil and I'm not sure if there is any saving to be done with anyone. An excellent, incredibly sad premise.

The Day of the Locust

In the words of Bonnie Tyler, "We're living in a powder keg giving off sparks." This is the Hollywood of the 1930s. People run to this sunny dreamworld only to be met with a fun house packed with temptation and uncertainty and failure. West describes Hollywood movie lots as a dumping grown of failed dreams, and you see that through the (failed and often gory) goals of the characters.

Miss Lonelyhearts Quote

A useful theory: “He sat in the window thinking. Man has a tropism for order. Keys in one pocket, change in another. Mandolins are tuned G D A E. The physical world has a tropism for disorder, entropy. Man against Nature … the battle of the centuries. Keys yearn to mix with change. Mandolins strive to get out of tune. Every order has within it the germ of destruction. All order is doomed, yet the battle is worthwhile.”

The Day of the Locust Quotes

A key description: "He crossed the bridge and followed a little path that ended at a Greek temple dedicated to Eros. The god himself lay face downward in a pile of old newspapers and bottles.
From the steps of the temple, he could see in the distance a road lined with Lombardy poplars. It was the one on which he had lost the cuirassiers. He pushed his way through a tangle of briars, old flats and iron junk, skirting the skeleton of a Zeppelin, a bamboo stockade, an adobe fort, the wooden horse of Troy, a flight of baroque palace stairs that started in a bed of weeds and ended against the branches of an oak, part of the Fourteenth Street elevated station, a Dutch windmill, the bones of a dinosaur, the upper half of the Merrimac, a corner of a Mayan temple, until he finally reached the road."


On 1930s Hollywood churches: He spent his nights at the different Hollywood churches, drawing the worshipers. He visited the “Church of Christ, Physical” where holiness was attained through the constant use of chestweights and spring grips; the “Church Invisible” where fortunes were told and the dead made to find lost objects; the “Tabernacle of the Third Coming” where a woman in male clothing preached the “Crusade Against Salt”; and the “Temple Moderne” under whose glass and chromium roof “Brain-Breathing, the Secret of the Aztecs” was taught.

Another theory: Tod didn’t laugh at the man’s rhetoric. He knew it was unimportant. What mattered were his messianic rage and the emotional response of his hearers. They sprang to their feet, shaking their fists and shouting.

( )
  amysueagnes | Feb 21, 2020 |
nessuna recensione | aggiungi una recensione

» Aggiungi altri autori (4 potenziali)

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Nathanael Westautore primariotutte le edizionicalcolato
Kuhlman, GildaProgetto della copertinaautore secondariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Lethem, JonathanIntroduzioneautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
Devi effettuare l'accesso per contribuire alle Informazioni generali.
Per maggiori spiegazioni, vedi la pagina di aiuto delle informazioni generali.
Titolo canonico
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Titolo originale
Titoli alternativi
Data della prima edizione
Personaggi
Luoghi significativi
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Eventi significativi
Film correlati
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
Premi e riconoscimenti
Epigrafe
Dedica
Incipit
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
The Miss Lonelyhearts of the New York Post-Dispatch (Are you in trouble?--Do-you-need-advice?--Write-to-Miss-Lonelyhearts-and-she-will-help-you) say at his desk and stared at a piece of white cardboard.
Around quitting time, Tod Hackett heard a great din on the road outside his office.
Citazioni
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
“Perhaps I can make you understand. Let’s start from the beginning. A man is hired to give advice to the readers of a newspaper. The job is a circulation stunt and the whole staff considers it a joke. He welcomes the job, for it might lead to a gossip column, and anyway he’s tired of being a leg man. He too considers the job a joke, but after several months at it, the joke begins to escape him. He sees that the majority of the letters are profoundly humble pleas for moral and spiritual advice, and they are inarticulate expressions of genuine suffering. He also discovers that his correspondents take him seriously. For the first time in his life, he is forced to examine the values by which he lives. This examination shows him that he is the victim of the joke and not its perpetrator.”

(Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts)
Ultime parole
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
(Click per vedere. Attenzione: può contenere anticipazioni.)
(Click per vedere. Attenzione: può contenere anticipazioni.)
Nota di disambiguazione
Dati dalle informazioni generali inglesi. Modifica per tradurlo nella tua lingua.
This work contains both Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust. Do not combine with entries for either work alone.
Redattore editoriale
Elogi
Lingua originale
DDC/MDS Canonico
LCC canonico

Risorse esterne che parlano di questo libro

Wikipedia in inglese (1)

"Miss Lonelyhearts -- compared by Flannery O'Connor to Faulkner's As I Lay Dying -- is about a newspaper reporter assigned to write the agony column, but, caught up in a vision of suffering, he seeks a way out (through art, sex, religion), only to be rebuffed at every turn by his cynical editor Shrike. The Day of the Locust -- considered by many to be the best novel ever written about Hollywood -- is about Tod Hackett, who hopes for a career in set design only to discover the boredom and emptiness of Hollywood's inhabitants. In the end, only blood will serve. The day of the locust is at hand ..."--Publisher's website.

Non sono state trovate descrizioni di biblioteche

Descrizione del libro
Riassunto haiku

Copertine popolari

Link rapidi

Voto

Media: (3.89)
0.5 2
1 9
1.5 1
2 24
2.5 8
3 73
3.5 15
4 126
4.5 26
5 120

Sei tu?

Diventa un autore di LibraryThing.

 

A proposito di | Contatto | LibraryThing.com | Privacy/Condizioni d'uso | Guida/FAQ | Blog | Negozio | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteche di personaggi celebri | Recensori in anteprima | Informazioni generali | 173,619,385 libri! | Barra superiore: Sempre visibile