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In un batter di ciglia: il potere segreto del pensiero intuitivo

di Malcolm Gladwell

Altri autori: Vedi la sezione altri autori.

UtentiRecensioniPopolaritàMedia votiCitazioni
19,018361179 (3.74)208
How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.… (altro)
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» Vedi le 208 citazioni

Inglese (353)  Spagnolo (4)  Olandese (2)  Rumeno (1)  Svedese (1)  Ungherese (1)  Russo (1)  Tutte le lingue (363)
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In his international bestseller The tipping Point, Malcom Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionized the way we understand the world within.
  Daniel464 | Sep 25, 2021 |
Riveting in some parts-- slightly long in others. However, I loved the examples. I've read John Gottman and now, based on this book, I want to study FACS. I also find it quite relevant to some of the current political concerns. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
(49) This was an interesting book by an author I hear a lot about but that I have never read. It is sort of 'pop' psychology - taking about human behavior in an accessible way with lots of little interesting stories. This is about the power of our unconscious thinking and how it often knows a truth before our conscious brain does, or perhaps our conscious brain will never come to the same conclusion. I learned a great new phrase - 'paralysis through analysis' - I sure see a lot of that at my work. Just make a decision already!

While interesting, Gladwell then goes on to relay stories where unconscious thinking leads to disaster - death of innocent black people, discrimination against female musicians, etc. So then his thesis re: harnessing the power of your unconscious thinking starts to break down. I never felt he really presented a case for 'training' your unconscious and/or when to analyze and when to go with your gut so to speak. My 'gut' tells me this book gave me conflicting information.

I would potentially read this author again though I am not quite convinced that he is deserving of such popularity. After all, haven't we always known the things he set forth in this book. Sometimes your first impressions are the right ones, sometimes they are not. Not so mind-blowing after all. ( )
  jhowell | Sep 19, 2021 |
If you are looking for a practical how to do book this is not it. It's more or less a compilation of scientific facts about intuitive intelligence, first impressions and fast thinking under stress.
That been said, I really enjoyed reading it. It was highly informative and fun. It also has good books recommendations in the area of nonverbal communication and other social psychology topics.
After reading it I find myself being more attentive at my first reactions when meeting people, details that I miss and things that I assume because of how they look.
So, in one word I would describe the book as insightful. ( )
  luzestrella | Aug 18, 2021 |
3.5 *

This is Malcolm Gladwell's second book after [b:The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference|2612|The Tipping Point How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference|Malcolm Gladwell|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1473396980s/2612.jpg|2124255] and the second book of his I read in the space of a couple of weeks. Unsurprisingly, there are similarities in Gladwell's approach to his themes. He starts with an arresting anecdote, which he uses to introduce his subject. Then, after setting out the elements of his thesis, he addresses them one by one in the ensuing chapters, illustrating his points with intriguing examples, stories and references to psychological experiments.

In many ways, Gladwell's second book is even more ambitious than "The Tipping-Point". In the latter work, he sought to explain "cultural/social epidemics" or what makes a particular idea or product suddenly popular. In this book, he not only tries to explain what goes on in our minds when we make "snap judgments", but, as declared in the introduction "the third and most important task of this book is to convince you that our snap judgments and first impressions can be educated and controlled".

After reading the introduction, one would surely be forgiven for expecting this to be a "self-help book", a guide to harnessing the power of "thin slicing" or "making a little knowledge going a long way". The problem is that the book is nothing of the sort. Its initial message seems to be that "snap judgments" are great: art experts recognise forgeries when all evidence points to the contrary, a particular psychologist is able to predict the longevity of a marriage just by watching moments of a conversation between a couple - the list of such amazing examples just goes on. However, most of the book is then spent describing what can go wrong with snap judgments. And an awful lot can go wrong, apparently. Unconscious bias affects even the fairest of subjects, stress can turn us momentarily "autistic", some matters just cannot be assessed through "first impressions". The conclusion seems to be that there are no magic solutions to these shortcomings - except becoming experts in our respective fields, being conscious of our unconscious bias (and consciously trying to overcome it) and training to either avoid or get used to stressful situations.

There's no denying Gladwell's flowing and entertaining style and I will treasure some of the insights contained in the book (I was particularly struck by the evidence for "unconscious bias"). However, at the end of this read I felt somewhat let down.

Thinking without thinking? Think again... ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Mar 5, 2021 |
Beyond question, Gladwell has succeeded in his avowed aim. Though perhaps less immediately seductive than the title and theme of The Tipping Point, Blink satisfies and gratifies.
 
If you want to trust my snap judgment, buy this book: you'll be delighted. If you want to trust my more reflective second judgment, buy it: you'll be delighted but frustrated, troubled and left wanting more.
 
"Blink" brims with surprising insights about our world and ourselves, ideas that you'll have a hard time getting out of your head, things you'll itch to share with all your friends.
aggiunto da stephmo | modificaSalon.com, Farhad Manjoo (Jan 13, 2005)
 
You can't judge a book by its cover. But Gladwell had me at hello — and kept me hooked to the final page.
 
As a researcher, Gladwell doesn't break much new ground. But he's talented at popularizing others' research. He's a clever storyteller who synthesizes and translates the work of psychologists, market researchers and criminologists.
aggiunto da stephmo | modificaUSA Today, Bob Minzesheimer (Jan 10, 2005)
 

» Aggiungi altri autori (9 potenziali)

Nome dell'autoreRuoloTipo di autoreOpera?Stato
Gladwell, Malcolmautore primariotutte le edizioniconfermato
Gladwell, MalcolmNarratoreautore secondarioalcune edizioniconfermato
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To my parents, Joyce and Graham Gladwell
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In September of 1983, an art dealer by the name of Gianfranco Becchina approached the J. Paul Getty Museum in California. (Introduction)
Some years ago, a young couple came to the University of Washington to visit the laboratory of a psychologist named John Gottman.
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How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

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Hachette Book Group

5 edizioni di questo libro sono state pubblicate da Hachette Book Group.

Edizioni: 0316172324, 0316010669, 1586217194, 1586217615, 0316011789

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Una edizione di quest'opera è stata pubblicata da Penguin Australia.

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