Gays favourite colour

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Gays favourite colour

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1parrhesiastes
Gen 9, 2007, 12:06pm

I have a somewhat vague notion of coming across references stating the favourite colour of homosexual men is green, harking back to early sexology. Some time ago I managed to find a passage in Psychopathia sexualis on the topic, but now I can't seem to able to retrace the exact spot. So what I'm curious for now is whether anyone out there got any more references, maybe even predating 1886?

2ExVivre
Gen 17, 2007, 7:50pm

Are you perhaps thinking of the popular lore of "wearing (insert color) (insert item of clothing) on (insert day of the week) if you're queer"? Green socks on Thursday is an oft-referenced version.

Personally, most green is horrid for my complexion. ;)

3Qwofacenosehead
Feb 6, 2007, 9:08pm

Judy Grahn's Another Mother Tongue has some discussion of this.

4parrhesiastes
Mar 23, 2008, 9:53pm

I think I've found it! Though not in Psychopathia sexualis, but in Ellis's Sexual inversion. The third edition (1926, available here: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/13611) states:

"History VIII (...) his favorite color is green."

"History XII (...) He has a special predilection for green; it is the predominant color in the decoration of his room, and everything green appeals to him. He finds that the love of green (and also of violet and purple) is very widespread among his inverted friends."

"Histories XXIX and XXX (...) His favorite color is green."

"History XXXII (...) My favorite color is green."

"One of my correspondents, M. N., writes to me: "With regard to the general inability of inverts to whistle (I am not able to do so myself), their fondness for green (my favorite color) (...)""

"It has also been remarked that inverts exhibit a preference for green garments. In Rome cinædi were for this reason called galbanati. Chevalier remarks that some years ago a band of pederasts at Paris wore green cravats as a badge. This decided preference for green is well marked in several of my cases of both sexes, and in some at least the preference certainly arose spontaneously. Green (as Jastrow and others have shown) is very rarely the favorite color of adults of the Anglo-Saxon race, though some inquirers have found it to be more commonly a preferred color among children, especially girls, and it is more often preferred by women than by men."

Seems like pretty compelling evidence to me! American gays, though, should take note of this:

""It is red," writes an American correspondent, himself inverted, "that has become almost a synonym for sexual inversion, not only in the minds of inverts themselves, but in the popular mind. To wear a red necktie on the street is to invite remarks from newsboys and others—remarks that have the practices of inverts for their theme. A friend told me once that when a group of street-boys caught sight of the red necktie he was wearing they sucked their fingers in imitation of fellatio. Male prostitutes who walk the streets of Philadelphia and New York almost invariably wear red neckties. It is the badge of all their tribe."